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 Post subject: Not a rare book but...
PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 5:40 pm 

Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 4:00 pm
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Noticed the Phillips family on the site (sorry not sure if that is one or two l's) who came up from Cornwall in the 1870's. The link is with Portia's family. There is a good book which may be known to those with interest in Cornish decendents called "Balmaidens" written by Lynne Mayers, publishers Hypatia Trust. It gives insight into the lives of the mining community, particularly of the women and movement of families out of the area. We have Susan Jane Champion who came up with her father and extended family from Camborne /Redruth to "Little Cornwall" in Burnley and subsequently married William James Bradshaw my GG Grandfather whose family came from Haggate. Have yet to put all the "bits of paper" together and put the family info onto the site!


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 6:08 pm 
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Interesting that Judi. I think "Little Cornwall"in Burnley was near the Griffin Pub at the bottom of the Rossendale Road area. I believe in 1873 a lot of Cornish miners came up to Burnley to work in the Coal mines to break a strike, and many of them lived in one particular area.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 7:59 pm 
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Thanks for the info about the book Judi. It should prove quite interesting because one of the Phillips women, at age 14, was described as a mine girl.
What David says about the Cornish miners being brought in to break the strike agrees what my father-in-law told us (his g'grandfather Richard Phillips was one of them).However he also said that they didn't know till they got here that the Burnley miiners were on strike and that some of them (Richard included) refused to go down the pit when they found out,and found other work instead.

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Last edited by portia on Sat Feb 02, 2008 2:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Cornish Migrants
PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 4:26 pm 

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You are right about the strike. There is some interesting information on this written by Ian Omerod called "1873 Coal Strike in Burnley and the Devon and Cornwall men and their families who came to the area." Burnley Library a couple of years ago had a copy of the original paper which Ian wrote, he was in the process of updating it and he generously sent me a draft. I do not know if this has been finalised with a copy in the Library.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 5:25 pm 
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Location: Richards Landing, Ontario, Canada
I found this interesting...such a mine of information! :roll: :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 5:26 pm 
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I found this in "Burnley A Short History" by Brian Hall.

Coal-mining also grew considerably between 1850 and 1900. Many new mines were sunk including Hapton Valley 1853 Bank Hall 1867 Cheapside 1872 and Clifton 1876 and the number of underground workers increased from 1,600 in 1850 to 2,400 in 1900. During this period there were many miners strikes. The most serious was in 1873 when the local colliery owners agreed to employ only non union labour. The strike lasted for over a year and the owners brought miners from Devon and Cornwall to work the pits. Many were found homes near The Griffin Inn, an area which became known as "Little Cornwall". The early years of the 20th century saw increasing difficulties for coal mining, as costs of production rose and new machinery became necessary. These were the first of the problems which were to affect the whole of Burnley's industrial life in the years following the First World War.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 5:39 pm 
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Yes Suzy certainly a mine of information. Canadian humour cracks me up :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 6:18 pm 
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Thanks David...the Candians say my British humour cracks them up...go figure!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 7:19 pm 
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Not sure if this is connected to our Phillips

Burnley Express and Advertiser, June 5, 1926
Belated Golden Wedding Celebration
There is to be a happy gathering at the Salvation Army Hall, Holme Street, tonight, in celebration of the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Phillips, of 56 May Street. The event is somewhat belated in that Mr. and Mrs. Phillips were married at Burnley Registry Office in May, 1875, and celebrations should have taken place last year. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, who reside with a married daughter, Mrs. Buzza, are both 69 years of age, Mrs.
Phillips being 69 on May 10th, and her husband on the following day. They hail from Cornwall, and came to this locality with a contingent of Cornwall people who came to work in Lancashire mines about 57 years ago. Mr. Phillips was brought up in a fishing town, and participated in the fishing industry until he was twelve years of age. He admitted he did not like the mill, saying he would “sooner be in prison” and he soon commenced work in the coal mine, an occupation he has followed up to the present day. He has worked at Bank Hall Colliery for about twenty years, and he and Mr. Dan Duxbury, J.P.
are trustees of Bank Hall Miners Lodge. He has also been on the committee for many years. Mrs Phillips father was a foreman in a Cornwall copper mine, and prior to coming to this district she used to walk seven miles each day to earn 4d. a day in the copper mines. She received her “salary” at the end of each month. For twenty years Mr. and Mrs. Phillips have had a close connection with the Salvation Army at Fulledge. They have had eleven children, seven of whom are still living, and they have nineteen grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2008 2:12 am 
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Kris I've tried every which way in the past to connect this family to the tree - without success. Phillips seems to have been a very common name in cornwall at the time. Buzza's not as rare as I might have thought either

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