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PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 12:08 pm 
Spider Lady
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Location: Staffordshire
The Preston Guardian
Saturday July 5 1845

Midsummer Quarter Sessions

Richard Crompton 24 (imp.) was charged with stealing, at Habergham Eaves, one plane, one blanket, and 25 shillings worth of copper, the property of John dugdale and others. He pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to 1 month's imprisonment in the HOuse of Correciton with solitary confinement, and to be once severely whipped.

Wilkinson Tattersall 16 (imp.), charged with stealing, at Habergham Eaves, on the 23rd of May, 1 apron, and 1 handkerchief, the property of his mother, Sarah Tattersall, and there being a previous conviction recorded against him., the Court sentenced him to hard labour in the House of Correction, for six months, first and last three weeks solitary confinement, and to be once severely whipped.

Ellen Eastwood, 40(n.), pleaded guilty to stealing at Burnley, on the 5th June, 1 dress, 1 waistcoat, 2 coats, and three pairs of trowsers, the property of Lydia Whittaker, and another. Two months' imprisonment.

Matthew Musgrove, 22 (n.), pleaded guilty to stealing at Barrowford Booth, on the 9th of June, two silver tea-spoons, the property of John Hartley. Sentenced to ahrd labour in the House of Correction for two motnhs.

Mary Price, 22 (n.), charged with stealing, at Burnley, on the 7th of June, two pairs of stockings, the property of James Hill, pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to two months' hard labour.

James Mitchell, 19 (imp.), pleaded guilty to stealing at Colne, on the 20th June, one horse, and saddle and bridle, the property of Mary Newell. four months' imprisonment; first and last three weeks solitary confinement, and to be once whipped.

Joseph Driver, 53 (imp.), pleaded guilty to stealing at Colne, seven pack sheets, the property of William Walton. One month's solitary confinement.

James Dean,25 (imp.), charged with stealing at Burnley, a coat, the property of Thomas Merryweather, pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to one month's solitary confinement.

Elizabeth Dunkerley, 28 (imp.), was charged with stealing, at Burnley, on the 17th June, a blanket, a bed quilt, and a petticoat, the property of Ann Hanison. Mr Wigham prosecuted. The prisoner who lodged at the house of the prosecutrix and was drinking with her at a beer shop, asked the prosecutrix for the key of her house, to go and see if her (prisoner's) money was safe. She went to the house, and took away the articles, which she pawned for 5s. Prisoner alleged in defence, that the prosecutrix had sent her to pawn them. To be imprisoned for three months.

Agnes Wilson 26 (n.), was charged with stealing at Colne, on the 18th June, a dress, the property of John Tattersall. Mr Ingham prosecuted. The prisoner alodged at the house of the prosecutor at Burnley, from which she took away the dress, and it was found upon her at Colne, on the same day that she left the prosecutor's house. Prisoner stated the gown was lent to her by prosecutor's house-keeper. Found guilty, and having been twice previously convicted, she was sentenced to seven years' transportation.

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Last edited by Mel on Sun Mar 30, 2008 9:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 1:39 pm 
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I can't help thinking that although the punishments may appear harsh by todays standards I bet these offenders thought twice before re-offending.and I really feel we need to be getting back to these sorts of punishments to deter the lowlifes that we see today.
Today's "do-gooders" would have been in their element in those days :cry:

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 9:50 am 
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Judging by the number of occasions it mentions previous convictions, I'm not altogether sure it did work David.
But I agree, the do-gooders would have had a field day.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 5:57 pm 
Spider Lady
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The Preston Guardian

Saturday July 2 1853

Midsummer Quarter Sessions

Rose Malone, 20, and Ben Newsham, 21, stealing at Barrowford Booth, one pair of ladies cloth boots, the property of Robert Atkinson. Three months each.

Henry Hallatt, 21, stealing at Great and Little Marsden, one hammer, the property of Joseph Stansfield. One month.

Thomas Slater, 37, stealing at Great and Little Marsden, one printed gingham frock, the property of John Baldwin; also, one top-coat, the property of Thomas Marsden. Six months.

Henry Hartley, 42, feloniously receiving at Foulridge, twelve double gross of worsted weft, the property of Samuel Catlow, well knowing the same to have been stolen. Twelve months.

Alexander Knowles, 33, and John Roberts, 32, feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of Samuel Catlow, at Colne, and stealing twelve double gross of worsted weft, the property of Samuel Catlow. Acquitted.

Edward wilson, 27, stealing at Colne, one silver watch, the property of Robert Foulds, from his person. Fifteen years' transportation.

Patrick Halloran, 32, stealing at Burnley, one coat, the property of John Coleman. Three months.

John Sharples, 38, stealing at Burnley, £14 and one purse, the property of Thomas Ellison. Twelve months.

John Roberts, 22, and Alfred Hargreaves, 18, stealing at Habergham Eaves, one pair of boots, the property of Robt. Fletcher; also, one table cover, the property of Robt. Hartley. Six months.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 1:32 pm 

Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:51 am
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Location: norwich
One of the prisoners was sentenced to seven years transportation what and where would this have been.
sues


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 2:29 pm 
Spider Lady
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I think it was when they were sent to Australia though I'm not sure.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 8:17 am 
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15yrs transportation for stealing a silver watch--crikey. I don't think they were transported to any other places bar Australia and Tasmania, were they?

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 8:37 am 

Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:51 am
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It makes you wonder how many came back to Burnley?
sues.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 2:51 pm 

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 1:27 am
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Some convicts were transported to North America in the eighteenth century, but this ended with the War of Independence. New South Wales was the next penal colony and the First Fleet, (of convicts) arrived in Botany Bay in January 1788. Transportation to Australia and Tasmania continued for years, and finally ended in Australia in 1868, although none were transported to NSW after about 1851.

While waiting for transportation the convicts were often housed in prison hulks on the River Thames, where conditions were terrible and disease widespread.

After a few years into their sentence convicts could get a ticket of leave which gave them more freedoms than before. It would be interesting to know how many returned eventually. Many did well in Australia.

One of my ancestors sailed to Australia, although not as a convict, let me add, and I did some reading about it.

Joan


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 10:29 am 

Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:51 am
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Location: norwich
Joan that sounds interesting , have you any idea what book it was you read.
sues


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 6:09 pm 

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 1:27 am
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Sorry, Sues, I don't remember the name of the book. It was in the Reference Library here and told of those sent to Australia. It is interesting when you consider that some of those transported may have been our ancestors.

There were eleven ships in that First Fleet.The Second Fleet arriving in 1790 had four ships, one of which had a 33% convict death rate from illnesses contracted on board or when imprisoned while awaiting transportation. Many were ill when they arrived. Occasionally wives and children accompanied them, or they came later.

On arrival the convicts worked either for the government or for private individuals. Some later got a ticket of leave which allowed them to work for themselves but they had to stay in the area and report to authorities, similar to the probation system today.

Those with specific sentences, e.g. seven years, received a Certificate of Freedom at the end of it, while those with a life sentence could receive a pardon. Most had a conditional pardon and had to stay in the colony. Only a few were granted an absolute pardon and could stay or return to Britain, so I should think very few came back.

The National Archives in London has an overview of information at

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/cata ... fletID=347

There's a reading list at the end of that page, section 9, which might include books available in a UK library.

and another site is

http://www.convictcentral.com/

Joan


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 6:33 pm 

Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:51 am
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Location: norwich
Joan thanks for the info, I went on to the National Archives reading list the book I wanted was out of print but I found and ordered a used one from Amazon so that will keep me busy.The convict site looks interesting.
sues


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PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2010 1:34 am 
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The Bishopsgate Library (London) has a collection of old Australian newspapers (facsimiles) that relate to people from the second fleet. http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/content.a ... goryID=968


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