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PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 10:16 pm 
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I am sooooooooooooooo jealous Maureen,have a great time :D

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 6:45 am 

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Location: New Zealand
Maureen ...wow sounds lovely ...i'm green with envy!
About the Hall, someone mentioned seances etc in a previous post. It reminds me of a hotel in Thames New Zealand called the Brian Boru. Now evidently at some stage in it's history there was a real murder there (this hotel is one of many in an old gold mining town). Some bright spark decided to refurbish the hotel to it's former glory and have 'murder nights' there where you could stay and try to solve a staged but realistic 'murder'. They employed actors and actresses to provide the 'murder'.I'm not sure about now but a few years ago you had to book and it was sold out for months in advance. I'm told it was great fun and games! wouldn't that be a cool idea for Extwistle Hall!? nothing a mere 2 or so mil can't fix!
Where do I send my donation?!

Glenys

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 9:20 am 
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I will PM you my back account details Glenys :lol: :lol: :roll:

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 1:12 pm 
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Not sure if this has been posted before but it is taken from British History On Line Website.

EXTWISTLE HALL, now a farm-house, stands on a high ridge of land between the valleys of the Don and Swinden Water in a bleak and commanding situation, and is a lofty three-story building with end gables and mullioned windows, said to have been erected by John Parker in the latter half of the 16th century. The principal front faces north, and the fall of the ground southwards allowing of a basement makes the house one of four stories on that side, where the chief feature is the massive chimney of the hall, which projects 5 ft. and has a width of 15 ft. The house, which is built of local gritstone with stoneslated roofs, consists of a rectangular block 34 ft. by 27 ft. 6 in. externally, and a north-west wing 19 ft. by 14 ft. 6 in., with a lower two-story building with plain gabled roofs on the east end. A former wing on the west side, however, fell down some time during the first half of the 19th century, destroying what is said to have been one of the best apartments and others known as the ladies' rooms. (fn. 66) In front of the house is a small flagged courtyard 43 ft. long by 33 ft. in width, partly inclosed on the west side by the north-west wing, and on the east by the lower buildings. The north side has a high fence wall with moulded coping and balled gate-piers fronting the road. The great hall, which is about 24 ft. by 21 ft., occupies the eastern end of the first floor of the main block and is approached from the forecourt by a wide flight of stone steps forming a very picturesque feature. The entrance in the north-west corner through a four-centred doorway with label and square panel over is now built up, but the north wall still retains unimpaired its lofty ten-light mullioned window with double transoms and hood mould. The floor of the hall is 7 ft. above the general level of the courtyard, to which there is a descent of five steps from the main gateway. The south wall of the hall is occupied almost entirely by the fireplace, the Tudor arched opening of which, however, is now built up, and the room is in a more or less dilapidated state. Portions of an ornamental plaster ceiling and of a carved oak beam are still to be seen, and above the fireplace is a fragment of ornamental plaster work with the words 'nescio cujus' remaining. The staircase, which is of stone, is in the west side of the house, and above the hall is a large room open to the roof and lit by two low mullioned windows of five lights each below the eaves on the north side. The north-west wing, which may be a 17th-century addition, is less severe in appearance than the main block, but is of equal height and of four stories, two of its floors ranging with the height of the great hall. The walls are finished with a plain parapet and balled gables which together with its many mullioned and transomed windows afford some relief to the otherwise rather bare west gable end of the main block. At the back is a small three-light window with round-headed lights under a square head, the only one of this type in the building.

By an explosion of gunpowder in the house in March 1717 much damage was done, and shortly afterwards the family finally quitted the hall, which has since been occupied intermittently by tenant farmers, who chiefly use, however, the basement or ground floor rooms and those in the lower east wing. The appearance of the building in its lonely and commanding position and its present state of semidesolation and abandonment is very striking.

In 1561 the 'byrelaw of Extwistle' was confirmed by John Towneley of Towneley, John Parker of Extwistle and others. (fn. 67) An agreement as to the inclosure of commons, moor, &c., was made in 1594. (fn. 68

There was a family taking a name from the township, but no connected account can be given of it. (fn. 69) Lands in Extwistle were given for a chantry in Burnley Church by Peter Tattersall before 1388. (fn. 70) Some minor transactions are on record. (fn. 71)

In 1524 the following contributed to the subsidy for their lands: Lawrence Briercliffe, Edmund and John Parker. (fn. 72) In 1564 John Parker, Lawrence Briercliffe and William Halsted. (fn. 73) In 1597 John Parker and Robert Briercliffe. (fn. 74) In 1626 John Parker and Lawrence Briercliffe; John and Bernard Towneley and others paid as non-communicants. (fn. 75)

In this township in 1666 there were 122 hearths liable to the tax. John Parker's house had eleven; the next in size were those of Lawrence Briercliffe, John Vipan and Richard Wilkinson with five each. (fn.76

For the Church of England St. James's, Briercliffe, was built in 1840, and had a district assigned to it in 1843. (fn. 77) The Hulme Trustees are patrons.

A Primitive Methodist chapel existed at Thursden before 1850. The Independent Methodists are now represented at Haggate.

The Baptist chapel at Haggate dates from 1763; in 1798 its 'faith and order differed somewhat from the other Baptist churches in England.' (fn. 78 Another was built at Hill Lane, to the east, in 1840; it is called Ebenezer, and is joined to the Baptist Union.

The Quakers, as above stated, anciently had a burial-ground at Folds House in Briercliffe. (fn. 79)

Footnotes .
66 Note by T. T. Wilkinson in Whitaker's Whalley (ed. 4), ii, 225.
67 Whitaker, op. cit. ii, 227. Four byrelaw men were to be appointed. No townsman was to take a beast, &c., to the common except a poor man who had kine to give him milk or a horse to lead his 'elding' (fuel). A serving man might have ten sheep on the common. No one was to 'stawve' (stub) or cut any thorns in Swinden, or to sell any slate out of the township. No grass was to be cut between 25 Dec. and 30 Sept. 'Ring yards' were to be made before 15 Mar., on which day all cattle were to be sent out of the fields.
68 Ducatus Lanc. iii, 210; between Robert Parker (who held with John Towneley, John Parker, John Robinson and John Woodroffe) and Bernard Towneley and other inhabitants. Robert Parker was the tenant of Holden House, from whom at the same time John Parker claimed a rent of 4s. 4d.; ibid.
For a decree as to the wastes, delfs, &c., see Lancs. and Ches. Rec. (Rec. Soc. Lancs. and Ches.), ii, 274.
69 In 1259–60 Sabina, Avice and Mabel daughters of Alexander de Extwistle gave ½ mark for an assize; Originalia, 44 Hen. III, m. 8.
Matthew de Extwistle granted to Richard son of Henry his nephew (nepoti) 3 acres in Extwistle for a rent of 12d. yearly; Add. MS. 32104, no. 450.
Matthew son of Nicholas de Extwistle and William son of Matthew de Extwistle granted a rent of 2s. to Robert at Bridge of Burnley; C 8, 13, E 31, 21. The second charter states that the 2s. came from the lands of Henry de Holrenhead and Adam de Monachis. Henry son of Richard de Holrenhead (or Ollerhead) acquired for 26s. the lands of Adam son of Gilbert de Ruelay (or Rowley); he was to render yearly 12d. and a pair of white gloves; ibid. R 66. The same Henry in 1317 gave them to Thomas son of Hugh de Holrenhead; ibid. H 248. Agnes de Holrenhead in 1393–4 granted to William her son the lands she had had of the gift of Robert de Holrenhead her father; ibid. H 273.
70 Lancs. Inq. p.m. (Chet. Soc.), i, 32. The tenure of the lands is not stated.
71 The Parkers of Holden have been mentioned in previous notes. In 1581 Robert Parker of Holden Clough, stating that he in conjunction with John Towneley of Towneley and Robert Parker of Extwistle had divided land called Deeplache Croft, agreed that Edmund (son of John) Robinson of Old Laund should have the right to carry (over the portion assigned to him) between Stubbing and Holrenhead (Ollernhead); C 8, 13, P 56. Charles Towneley of Towneley in 1636 acquired the messuages formerly belonging to John Robinson and Edmund his son; ibid. T 168.
John Folds in 1455–6 granted the lands in Extwistle which he had inherited from William his father to John Clayton; Towneley MS. C 8, 13, F 43.
72 Subs. R. Lancs. bdle. 130, no. 82.
73 Ibid. bdle. 131, no. 212.
74 Ibid. no. 274.
75 Ibid. no. 317.
76 Ibid. bdle. 250, no. 9.
77 Lond. Gaz. 3 Jan. 1843.
78 Rippon, Bapt. Reg. iii, 20. It is now called a 'Scotch Baptist' chapel.
79 In 1665 Richard Wilkinson of Briercliffe was presented to the Bishop of Chester for allowing one Elizabeth Hartley to be 'buried contrary to the laws of the Church,' by the Quakers, but showed that he did not consent; Visit. Returns at Ches. Dioc. Reg.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 1:31 pm 
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DAVID B wrote:
The south wall of the hall is occupied almost entirely by the fireplace, the Tudor arched opening of which, however, is now built up, and the room is in a more or less dilapidated state. Portions of an ornamental plaster ceiling and of a carved oak beam are still to be seen, and above the fireplace is a fragment of ornamental plaster work with the words 'nescio cujus' remaining.


Next time I go to Extwistle Hall I am bringing a flashlight.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 3:25 pm 
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Is the fireplace still there Kris? or should I say, is anything still there?

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 3:38 pm 
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It was very dark Gloria. I tried to walk about but I didn’t know if there was a basement and if I would fall through the rotten boards. I went to the next level (there was a little light up there), but again the boards were rotten and there was no way I going to walk about, I definitely would have fallen through the floor. I took a photo of the first room to the left as you walk in from the back of the house, there was a hole where a fireplace used to be but I don’t know if there were fireplaces in other rooms of the house. Like I say, if I got back I am bringing a flashlight.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2008 9:30 am 
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Judging by the photos that Kris took, the place has been stripped bare.
I didn't go in with him. I stood waiting and wondering where he was. I didn't know he had gone inside. Good job he didn't fall through, I might still be waiting on the roadside now!!

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:16 am 
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I would have been right behind him, wouldn't have been able to resist it.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2008 12:38 pm 
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It was getting over the wall and the barbed wire that put me off.

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PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2008 4:08 pm 
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http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=cXnzfKQf6kY

Not sure if this has been posted before or not.
It's Extwistle Hall on youtube. Some youths wandered round inside with their videocamera.
If easily offended, turn off the volume though the worst I heard was s**t. No need for volume though as they don't say anything interesting.

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PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2008 4:53 pm 
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I’m surprised they didn’t fall through the floor.


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PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2008 6:07 pm 
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Interesting.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 7:19 am 
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East Lancashire heritage sites 'at risk'
Tuesday 8th July 2008

By Deborah Lewis

ELEVEN buildings and at least one park in East Lancashire have been named as threatened heritage sites.

A survey of England’s Grade I and II buildings, monuments, parks, gardens and landscapes by English Heritage has revealed a number of historical gems in the county whose future is under threat from “neglect, decay and change”.

Entitled Heritage At Risk, the project's first annual report was made public this week, and the register of buildings, battlefields and shipwrecks identifies 29 sites in total in Lancashire.

With five at risk, Burnley has the most sites in East Lancashire: Extwistle Hall and attached garden wall in Briercliffe; The Holme in Cliviger; an arched gateway and garden wall attached to south front of Shuttleworth Hall, Hapton; Shuttleworth Hall: barn on north east side of the road opposite Hurstwood Hall, Worsthorne.

Also on the register are the Canal Basin and Coke Oven in Hyndburn; Parkers Farmhouse in Cow Hill Lane, Rishton; Townhead in Slaidburn; Whalley Abbey (west range); a weaving mill power unit at Grane Mill, Lane Side Road, Haslingden; and a summerhouse east of Turton Tower, Chapeltown Road, North Turton.

Of these, Extwistle Hall, The Holme and Whalley Abbey are in the worst state of repair, according to English Heritage.

English Heritage is also in the process of identifying parks and landscapes at risk, including Woodfold Park in Mellor, which was laid out in the 1790s to accompany a country house designed by James Wyatt for Henry Sudell, a local cotton magnate.

A spokesperson said: “We are not yet publishing the full list of parks because we are still in discussion with owners, but there will undoubtedly be more in East Lancashire.

"Woodfold Park is just one case study we wanted to highlight.”

English Heritage, the government’s statutory adviser on the historic environment, is hoping Heritage At Risk, which shows one in 12 sites are at risk, will “galvanise the public into action before it’s too late”.

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 Post subject: Re: Extwistle Hall
PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2008 1:21 pm 
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http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/LANCS-BURNLEY-EXT ... .m14.l1318

Extwistle Hall postcard on ebay


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