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 Post subject: Furmety
PostPosted: Tue Feb 03, 2009 12:17 pm 
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http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/furmity
Furmity
(food) Alternative spelling of frumenty. A spiced porridge made by boiling culled wheat

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furmity
Frumenty (sometimes frumentee, furmity, fromity, or fermenty) was a popular dish in Western European medieval cuisine. It was made primarily from boiled, cracked wheat. Different recipes added milk, eggs or broth. Other recipes include almonds, currants, sugar, saffron and orange flower water. Frumenty was served with meat as a pottage, traditionally with venison or occasionally porpoise (considered a "fish" and therefore appropriate for Lent[1]).

For several centuries, frumenty was part of the traditional Celtic Christmas meal. In England it was often eaten on Mothering Sunday, the fourth Sunday of Lent. On that day many servants were allowed to visit their mothers and were often served frumenty to celebrate and give them a wholesome meal to prepare them for their return journey. The use of eggs would have been a brief respite from the Lenten fast. Frumentee is served with venison at a banquet in the mid-14th century North Midlands poem Wynnere and Wastoure: "Venyson with the frumentee, and fesanttes full riche / Baken mete therby one the burde sett" (334-5).[2]

The dish, described as 'furmity' and served with fruit and a slug of rum added under the counter, plays a major role in the plot of Thomas Hardy's novel The Mayor of Casterbridge. It is also mentioned in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass as a food that snap-dragon flies live on.

It has been asserted that frumenty is "our (England's) oldest national dish".[3]

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 Post subject: Re: Furmety
PostPosted: Tue Feb 03, 2009 12:18 pm 
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Furmety is mentioned in a Harwood Brierley article I am transcribing, I wasn't sure what it is/was.

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