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 Post subject: Long list of Lancs words
PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2008 6:01 pm 

Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:46 pm
Posts: 364
Location: cambridge
Now posted here, I put in error initially under 'Glossary'. I invited anyone to respond saying how many of the 72 words they knew, and where they were brought up.

Rex


Lancashire words and phrases

From Rex Watson, 2008

(Mainly from Burnley area)

Most of these are ones I remember from my childhood in Burnley. I was born there in 1944 and lived there till 1962, though have often visited since. Some therefore may be ones I have noted from a relative more recently. Particularly, some may derive from south Lancashire, where my mother was raised (Chadderton near Oldham).

Some may be slang words of the time, not really dialect. Others may just be old-fashioned words, widespread geographically, that have largely gone out of use.

Wright’s Dialect Dictionary has many of these, giving early instances and origin (e.g. Nordic, Anglo-Saxon). A few instances are noted here of use by dialect authors.


Words mainly

After (1). About (I asked after him. I asked how he was) [See Phrases also]
After (2). Later
Anyroad. Anyhow/anyway
As. That (e.g. him as lives up the hill)
As how. That (e.g. I think as how I’ll go out)
At. On (e.g. at Tuesday)
Back-end. Autumn or early winter
Back-word. Change of mind (regarding a transaction)
Bay-window. Posh [used, of talking, by Tommy Thompson]
Bog-eyed. Sleepy
Call. Criticise or berate
Chuffed. Pleased
Crammed. Tetchy
Fast. Stuck (e.g. zip). Fast for what to eat. Stuck for what to choose
Flob. Spit (noun or verb)
Fine up. Stop raining and brighten up
Flustered. Rushed
Gawmless/gormless. Stupid
Getten. Got
Ginnel. A narrow lane
Gob. Mouth
Going on. Nearly, usually of an age
Happen. Perhaps
Jack in. Give up
Jiggered. Tired
Knobstick. Strike-breaker (brought by Cornish miners, c.1873)
Lake. Play. If a worker is playing he is on holiday
Let on. Reveal (information)
Lick. Beat. Licked them hollow. Beat them easily
Likely. Sharp, alert
Lose. Come out ( a crowd after a football match, a factory, a school)
Lug (1) /lug oil (hole). Ear
Lug (2) Pull
Maiden. Clothes-horse
Mard. Mis-behaved/cocky (of a child)
Marlicking. Playing about
Mend (the fire). Tend the fire, put more coal on
Mind. Take care to remember
Moithered. Bothered/annoyed
Neb. Hard front part of cap
Nor. Than (e.g. Butter is better nor margarine)
Oin(ed). Annoy(ed)
Of. On (e.g. of a Saturday, on Saturdays)
On. Of (e.g. I know she will take care on him)
Panned out. Tired
Playing. Not working
Reet. Right
Rush (verb). Cost
Scullery. Kitchen
Shape. Organise (Shape yourself)
Shop. Way, situation. That’s the only shop. That’s the only way to do it
Shut of. Rid of
Sick (adjective). Deputising (A sick weaver is working for someone off sick)
Side. Clear, e.g. a table after eating
Singing. (Of a kettle when boiling)
Sken. Stare
Slated. Underskirt showing !
Sneck. Door-latch
Spell. Splinter (in finger say)
Standing. Waiting for work, particularly to replace someone absent
Stop up. Wait up (for someone late at night)
Suited. Pleased
Swank. Brag
Ta-ta (noun). Walk (to a child) [used by Waugh in ‘Besom Ben Stories’]
Think on. Remember
Throng(ed). Busy
Trim up. Put up (Christmas) decorations
Wesh. Wash
Vestibule. Hallway
Whatnot. Corner shelf
While. Until
Wick. Alive, alert


Phrases mainly

Better side out. Improved, after illness
Billy winks is coming. Sleep is coming [used by Tommy Thompson]
He’s after going out. He wants to go out, e.g. a dog
I don’t know anything else. I’ve no more news
I’ll go to the crows. I’ll be very surprised if I’m wrong [used by Waugh in ‘Besom Ben Stories’]
I’ll go to the foot of our stairs. I am surprised
Put wood in th’oil (the hole). Shut the door
Sling/Take your hook. Get off with you
I called myself (to do something). I meant (to do something)
I’d rather have something that’s jumped over a gate. (Wanting savoury dish rather than sweet !)
Tom Fowt shuffle. The shuffling effect on a pack of cards when they are dropped.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 2:15 pm 

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 1:27 am
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Rex, I thoroughly enjoyed your list. Almost all the words are familiar, used by my parents and Grandma, who all grew up in Burnley. The only words that are new to me with the meaning you give are flob, knobstick, sick, standing and shop.

I heard 'going on' referring to a specific age, e.g. he's going on eighty, and 'getting on' as simply becoming older, 'he's getting on.'

Mard in Accrington meant whiny, or soft. Vestibule was the small space between the front door and an inner door. The inner door opened onto a short lobby, or hallway. This was in a terraced house where the door didn't open directly into the parlour. A couple of others:

Ta-ra, (goodbye) was very common.

Stopping, for staying, when someone arrived, e.g. are you stopping?

My Grandma used to say the factory was 'playing,' during the wakes weeks.

The phrases aren't as familiar, but I do remember 'Billy winks is coming.' I'd clean forgotten about it until I read your list.

Joan


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 2:29 pm 
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I've heard of a lot of them.
I also know mard to mean whiny.

The maiden or clothes horse is known as a clothes maid in our house, not sure if that is just us or if it's what it's known as elsewhere?

A what not is absolutely anything that you cannot think of the name of - like a thingymajig.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 4:49 pm 

Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:51 am
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Location: norwich
This took me back to my childhood in Burnley and I still use a few of them, and the puzzled looks I get from people in Norwich. I still trim up at Christmas and get spells in me fingers
Going on of an age -eze gettin on a bit. Also I was always being told to stop lakeing about, stop being so Mard -soft. Wesh my dad always said he was having a swill.Wick -alive I was told to stop playing with that dog its wick (flea ridden).
The phrases made me laugh Better side out- his doing better,his on the mend.
I also remember being at school and a teacher not from Burnley asking the class where had we been playing the evening before I told him I had been playing up me grandads back his face was a picture.
sues


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 6:53 pm 
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Wick - nerves. (Getting on me wick)

As for the phrases, I hadn't heard the one "I’d rather have something that’s jumped over a gate. (Wanting savoury dish rather than sweet !)" but it does make a lot of sense!! I'll use it the next time we go out and see what hubbys reaction is. I have a savoury tooth where he has a sweet one.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:31 pm 

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Wick - something very fast, e.g. an insect. 'Watch out, it's wick.' Also, an insect was referred to as a wicky.

My dad also said 'swill' for wash. It could mean a person, clothes, or the front step.

Joan


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 7:07 am 
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While (until) is still used in Burnley today isn't it. One of my friends uses it quite a lot, it always makes me smile when she says it as it's not something I hear at all here in Stoke.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 8:14 am 
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I must say I knew most of those and I particularly like the word "oined", that does appear to be very local to Burnley. I get strange looks when I mention it other than there.
I love old lanky words----probably why Mel struggles to understand me. :wink:
And (never begin a sentence with "and") the grammar, sentences seem to make their own rules.---I don't know nowt---I do not know anything---suppose that is right then????

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 10:31 am 

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When I put a few of these words on OGFB some time ago, some people recognised and indeed still used 'oined'. I found it in Wright, I think : 'hoin'.

I am sure that the dialect of near Craven is very similar to that of Burnley-Nelson-Colne.

Rex


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 1:29 pm 
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Recognised most of them, still use a lot of them, excellent.


Stephanie.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 6:18 pm 
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Such fun remembering so many old words and phrases. some of which I use and it 'gives me away', here in Canada. Right, Joan?
I also recall a little useful phrase..."Nay, lass....tha's be getting to be a biggun". The 'nay' was a long drawn out one....naaaaay! and of course means "Now then"....

My grandparents were very strong with the dialect...my dad, not so much....and, of course, I was from Manchester (so thought to be 'baywindow by the local lads and lasses when I stayed in Harle Syke - and well reminded of it too, I might add!).
Thanks, all.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 7:29 am 
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I think you struggle a little to understand me too Gloria. The last time we met you couldn't keep up with anything I was saying!!

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 1:45 pm 
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My husband has a memory from his childhood of going to his Grans, when he used to ask "What's for tea Grandma" she always replied;

A spoonful o drowt,
a mousys yed,
an' three jumps at buthery dowr.


Stephanie.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 5:29 pm 
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Ha ha Mel, it takes me a while to get my ears tuned in---I thought I talked fast but you beat me into a cocked hat--as they used to say.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 5:37 pm 
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Apparently we are a mix of scouse and brum here!

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