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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 3:53 pm 

Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2012 10:33 pm
Posts: 4
Just seen this postcard for sale on ebay dated 1910, but cannot figure out where it is. Anybody know ?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 6:33 pm 

Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:46 pm
Posts: 364
Location: cambridge
It's at Wycoller, and although old, certainly isn't Roman ! Wycoller is a couple of miles from Colne, now a country park.

Called I think the 'Hall Bridge' (it's by the derelict hall) or 'Weavers' Bridge'.

See 'Portrait of Wycoller', by John Bentley.

I have the very same postcard, English version. I like the promotion of the Lancashire beaches on the French one !!

Rex


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:14 pm 

Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2012 10:33 pm
Posts: 4
I guessed it wasn't Roman, but didn't recognise it from the angle it was painted without the buildings on. I've crossed it many a time, usually after the brilliant pie and peas at the village cafe.
Thanks for the info


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:47 pm 

Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 7:55 pm
Posts: 175
The more common name for this bridge is "The Clapper Bridge" See Wikipedia Wycoller. The extract along with a photo reads.

A variety of ancient bridges cross Wycoller Beck, including 'Pack-Horse Bridge', a twin arched bridge in the centre of the village, 'Clapper Bridge' and 'Clam Bridge'. The last is believed to be of neolithic origin (at least, over 1,000 years old) and is listed as an ancient monument. It consists of just a long stone laid across the river. It was damaged by floods in 1989-90, though has now been repaired.

The name "Clapper" is said to be due to the sound of the weavers crossing it with their iron soled clogs. Where they were going to do their weaving remains a mystery to me. No doubt someone will explain where they worked.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 12:41 pm 

Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:46 pm
Posts: 364
Location: cambridge
John Bentley also gives 'Druids' Bridge' !

For 'clapper', wikipedia gives a meaning connected just to stones.

The weavers would be handloom ones, largely, at least until mid 19th century. They would have to carry their goods to Colne Piece Hall or some other centre, and likewise bring in their raw materials. Wycoller's population decline coincided largely with the demise of handloom weaving, I think.

John also says that it is thought that the bridge had only two slabs originally.

Rex


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:39 pm 

Joined: Fri Jun 08, 2012 12:04 pm
Posts: 172
The post card of what we always called the clapper bridge brought back happy memories of picnics at Wycoller in the 1950s.

It also brought to mind the expression 'to go like the clappers' (to go very fast) and I wondered if there might be a connection. However, a quick browse on the internet indicated no such link - suggesting rather that these clappers referred either to the clappers of bells (and more specifically to the clappers of the bells of hell); to fast-running rabbits (escaping from their hutches, called clapiers in French); or, even, to testicles and sexual activity! (For more detail, on possible derivations, see Michael Quinion's World Wide Words on:

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-lik3.htm

Ruth


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2013 5:15 pm 

Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 9:19 pm
Posts: 13
It makes you wonder whether or not it would be possible for this bridge to be used by the Romans from the Red Lees Rd camp above Ormerod Hall, when they need to get to Berwens camp at Elslack. An alternative route maybe from the Castercliffe route through Cob lane above the A56 through Earby.


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