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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 10:08 am 
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The Times
Tuesday September 4th 1894
Serious Boat Accident in Morecambe Bay
Many Lives Lost
Yesterday morning a terrible accident occurred in Morecambe Bay, not far from the watering place of Grange-over-Sands. It appears that a sailing boat left Morecambe about half-past 10 for Grange, having 25 or 26 persons on board. The boat was in charge of man named Houghton. The distance is about 8 miles. When he had gone about 5 miles Houghton was about to shift the sail for the purpose of counting the passengers, when a strong puff of wind struck the boat and caused it to heel over. The passengers rushed to one side, and the boat immediately capsized. The accident was witnessed from the shore at Grange, three miles away, and from Silverdale, about two miles off. It naturally caused the greatest consternation. Two other boats that happened to be near went at once to the assistance of the unfortunate people who were struggling in the water, and managed to save six of seven of them. All the rest, so far as can be ascertained, lost their lives. There were several children among the party.
The place where the boat capsized is regarded as very dangerous by boatmen, the channel having shifted considerably this summer.
Twelve bodies have been recovered and taken to Morecambe. Most of the excursionists were Burnley people who were spending their holidays at Morecambe. Several of the survivors were very much exhausted when they were landed at Morecambe between 1 and 2 o'clock in the afternoon, and vigorous means were at once taken to revive them. The boatman Houghton, who is said to be one of the most careful sailors in the town, was amongst those picked up.
The disaster has created a feeling of consternation amongst the thousands of visitors at present stopping in the town. Between two and three hundred boats are licensed by the local authorities to ply for hire on the coast; but visitors have for a long time enjoyed complete immunity from serious accidents. the delightful weather which prevailed in the morning, and which was in striking contrast to that which has been experienced of late, tempted a far greater number of people than usual to to embark upon the calm sea. There was only a light breeze, and boating appeared to be perfectly safe. Houghton's boat was one of the largest on the beach.
According to a statement made by a survivor, when the boat had reached a point two miles from Silverdale (which it should be mentioned, is a small watering place on the opposite side of the bay), the tide was on the flow, but as there was insufficient water to allow the boat to cross the sandbanks, it was allowed to drive steadily up the channel. When it was near to the estuary of the river Wear, which enters the bay the water was noticed to be rather choppy, owing to the rapidly running tidal current meeting the fresh water from the river. It was just then that suddenly and without the slightest warning the boat heeled completely over and went down. The man in charge of the boat that was able to render most assistance would not at first take any of the rescued persons into his boat, his instructions being simply that as many as possible should be supported on the gunwale until all chance of effecting further rescues was hopeless. By this means several lives were saved. After cruising about the spot until it was certain that no further aid could be rendered, the two boats that had been on the scene of the disaster returned in company to Morecambe at 1:30 and took with them the first news of the disaster. The earliest intimation to those on shore of anything being wrong was the landing of the body of a woman that had been recovered, and of the semi-conscious forms of a boy and girl. Prompt measures were taken to resuscitate those who showed any signs of life, and in tow cases these efforts proved successful. The bodies of the victims were conveyed to the Kings Arms Hoteland deposited in the dressing room of the local football club. The work of collecting particulars of the disaster was a difficult matter, as the rescued were too dazed to give a coherent account either of themselves or their fellow passengers. A complete list of the passengers has thus yet to be obtained.
Mr. John Lilley, chairman of the Morecambe Local Board, on hearing of the disaster, despatched a small steamer with several boats in tow to assist in the recovery of the bodies. The inquest will be opened this morning.
The boatman Houghton stated last night that at the time of the disaster - about 12 o'clock - he was going to "slack the main sheet and let her go easily up the channel" while he collected the fares. He had not slackened the sail but was on the point of doing so when a "bluff" of wind heeled the boat right over without the slightest warning.
James Boothman, a mule spinner, of Burnley, one of the survivors, declares, on the contrary, that it was just when Houghton had got the sail loose that a gust of wind caught it and capsized the boat. He does not, however, attribute any blame to Houghton.
William Milner, of Skipton, in describing the occurrrence, said they had enjoyed as pleasant asanyone could desire. No thought of danger was in their minds, and at the moment of the catastrophe the occupants of the forepart of the boat were singing a hymn. Milner says that when the boat heeled over the passengers with great presence of mind threw their weight on to the opposite side. In spite of this, amid exclamations of "We're going," the boat turned over.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 10:11 am 
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http://www.briercliffesociety.co.uk/Grave%20Stones/Haggate%20Chapel/S/Stanworth,%20Brierley%20and%20Halstead.htm

William Brierley died in the above disaster. The link is to his gravestone at Haggate.

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Last edited by Mel on Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 12:27 pm 
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William Brierley was my 2x gt grandfather.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 10:04 am 
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Was he Gloria! I was aware that you have Brierley's in your line but hadn't made the connection. I have 2 more articles from the Times for this disaster which I will be adding soon.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:51 am 
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I will send you the Brierley part of my tree, he is on that. Might not be today though.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 11:34 am 
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I think he was on the boat with two of his children who both survived. Will have a root about and see what I have on it.
Mel, is the Burnley Express account of this anywhere on the site?

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:26 pm 
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No but I have asked a friend to obtain it for me. It was one I was transcribing the Briercliffe gravestones that I first became aware of the disaster.
The Times doesn't list all of the victims/casualties and I hoped that Burnley might.

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Last edited by Mel on Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:44 pm 
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The Times
Wednesday September 5 1894
The Morecambe Boating Disaster

The sad event of Monday has cast a great gloom over the popular Lancashire health resort; and the precincts of the temporary mortuary were yesterday thronged by a crowd of visitors and residents anxious to learn the latest tidings regarding the victims of the catastrophe. Only three additional bodies were recovered. Two of these were identified as Sarah Robinson, 77, of Byerdon-Lane, Burnley and her daughter Florence, aged 35, a weaver. Mr Robinson, who was rescued, identified the remains, and was completely overcome by the sight. The third body recovered yesterday is that of a young man about 25 years of age. Upon it was found the halves of return ticket from Morecambe to Bradford and from Bradford to Cleckheaton, both dated Monday. The police at Cleckheaton have been communicated with for the purposes of identification. The recovery of these bodies increases the list of dead lying in the mortuary to 16. Nine persons are still reported missing, thus making the total number lost 25. With the nine survivors, therefore, the numberof persons ascertained to have been on board the yacht at the time of the accident is 34.
A most painful feature of the sad affair is the number of losses in certain families. A typical case is that of Daniel Whitehead, a cotton spinner, of Byerdon-Lane, Burnley, who broke down completely on identifying the bodies of his son Richard, aged 17, and his sister-in-law, Ann Ingham, his grief being intensified by the knowledge that his wife and infant son are among the missing. The case of Alice Greenwood and John Parkinson, brother and sister, both residing in Eastham Street, Burnley, is also particularly sad. The former, who is among the missing, leaves four orphan children quite unprovided for, and her brother leaves a widow and five young children. The untimely end of Joseph Fawcett Carter, a member of the reporting staff of the Bradford Observer, who with his wife and child are numbered with the dead, has caused great grief among his fellow journalists. It is stated that Mrs Carter was reluctant to go for the excursion, but was persuaded to join the party by her husband. Their landlady sat up during the night awaiting their return. A cousin, also staying in Morecambe, happened to call at the lodgings yesterday unaware of the fate of his relative and family, and, being told by a policeman at the door that they had the body of a young man suppsed to be a reporter within, went in and identified Carter, whose features bore indications of a terrible struggle for life. Mr. Carter was a son of the collector and librarian to the Bradford Choral Society, who, with Mr. Shepherd, the father of Mrs. Carter, whose body has not yet been recovered, arrived in Morecambe during the day. As soon as the undertaker has prepared the bodies for removal they will be forwarded to their respective homes. The search parties are maintaining a constant watch for the missing bodies. Several of the survivors have not yet sufficiently recovered to be released from the care of Dr. Watterson and Dr. Renton, but they are progressing favourably.
The following is a full list of the persons identified: - Wright SHEPHERD, bleachers finisher, 55, Prospect-hill, Turton; John HEATON, 51, blacksmiths striker, Gorton, near Manchester; William BRIERLEY, manufacturer, Briercliffe, Burnley; Richard WHITEHEAD, 81, Byerdon-lane, Burnley; Miss Ann INGHAM, sister-in-law of Mr WHITEHEAD; Samuel BROOKS, of Holcombe, Ramsbottom; his sister, Mrs. Ann WILLIAMS, widow, of Stubbins-lane, Ramsbottom; Jonas WEBSTER, mechanic, Newtown, Skipton; Joseph Fawcett CARTER, Lumpton-street, Bradford, a member of the reporting staff of the Bradford Observer; Doris CARTER, aged two years, his daughter; Edmund CLEGG, tackler, Belvedere-road, Ramsbottom; John PARKINSON, tackler, Eastham-street, Burnley. The remaining body is said to be that of Mrs. HARGREAVES, of Burnley, but no definite identification has yet been made.
As far as can be ascertained, the following are still unaccounted for:- Alice GREENWOOD, weaver, widow, Burnley; Arthur CLEGG, aged four years, son of Edmund CLEGG, whose body was discovered, and of Mrs. CLEGG, who was rescued and is progressing favourably; Miss HEATON, of Gorton, daughter of John HEATON, whose body was recovered; Mr. MONKS, of Bolton, brother-in-law of SHEPHERD and HEATON, whose bodies were recovered; Mrs CARTER, Bradford; Mrs. and Miss ROBINSON, Burnley; Mrs. WHITEHEAD and baby, Burnley, daughter and granddaughter of Jonas WEBSTER, Skipton. The cases of Parkinson and Alice Greenwood, brother and sister, are extremely sad. The former leaves a widow and five young children, and the latter four children of tender years.
The inquest opened yesterday at the King's Arms Hotel before Mr. Lawrence Holden, the coroner for the South Lonsdale division, there being also in attendance Superintendent Brynning and other police officers. Mr. John Lee, chairman of the Morecambe Local Board, was chairman.
The Coroner, in opening the inquiry, said he was sure that the minds of all present were filled with dismay at the terrible calamity of the previous day. A large party of pleasure-seekers were in a moment plunged into the sea, and a great many lives were lost, the exact number of which was not yet actually known. He proposed that day to call only evidence of identification, postponing all questions as to the capsizing of the boat and any question of negligence - if there had been any negligence - to a later period.
Joseph Hamer, of Tanner's-common, Ramsbottom, identified the body of Samuel Brooks as that of his uncle. He also identified his aunt and Ann Williams. Stuart Watmugh, wool buyer, Bradford, identified Mr. Joseph Fawcett Carter, of the Bradford Observer staff, and Mr. Carter's daughter Doris. He last saw them alive on Sunday evening, when they were on the Morecambe parade. Mrs. Carter was among those still missing. The bodies of Wright Shepherd and John Heaton were identified by the son of the latter, and those of Edmund Clegg and John Parkinson by the son of the former.
The inquiry was then adjourned until this morning. After the adjournment the body of Mr. William Brierley was definitely identified by his brother. Two more bodies were found about noon near Bolton-le-Sands, about two miles from the scene of the disaster, and landed at Morecambe Bay. They are those of a middle-aged married woman and a girl apparently about 16 years of age, and are belived to be those of Mrs. and Miss Robinson, of Burnley.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:47 pm 
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Mel wrote:
The Times doesn't list all of the victims/casualties and I hoped that Burnley might.


I was mistaken, the second Times report on the disaster does list the vctims and those still missing. I'm still interested in the Burnley take on the event. I wonder if they named the injured/survivors too?

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:56 pm 
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I don't know which of his two children were with William Brierley, perhaps they will be named in the Burnley Express report

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2007 7:18 am 
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It may be another two or three weeks before I get the Burnley version. My friend visits the library less during the school holidays because of all the kids that are around.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2007 9:51 am 
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Might try to get over myself sometime next week. You have roused my interest in this again.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2007 2:15 pm 
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The Times
Thursday September 6 1894
The Morecambe Disaster
The inquiry into the Morecambe disaster was resumed at the King's Arms
Hotel, Morecambe, yesterday morning, before Mr. Lawrence Holden, Coroner for South Lonsdale. Mr. William Tilly, solicitor, appeared to watch the case on behalf of the boatman, Samuel Houghton. Evidence of identification having been given,
James Boothman, spinner, of Burnley, one of the survivors, said that the yacht Matchless started on her trip just after 10 o'clock on Monday morning, there being about 30 passengers on board. The tide was coming in, but there was not much water in the bay. All went well until they got near Silverdale. Up to that time Houghton was at the rudder, and did not leave it until the boat capsized. He had said he was about to collect fares, but did not do so. Three of the party stood up in the front part of the boat, the sea being calm, but a sudden gust of wind, sufficient to blow off witness's hat, sprang up, and in a moment the vessle went over. He could not say how long he was in the water, but he retained consciousness. So far as he saw, there were no life-belts in the boat. All the passengers had maintained perfect order. By a juryman.-He did not go to the bottom and did not know what the depth of the water was. Witness, continuing, said there was not room in the boat for all to sit down. He could not say that Houghton was changing sails.
Benjamin Robinson, recalled, said all went well until they got near Silverdale. He was next to Boothman, and they were seated for a time, but becoming stiff both stood up together. They had been standing for a while in the bow, when suddenly the wind took off Boothmans billycock hat, and the vessel went over in an instant. The boatman was in his seat all the time from starting, and kept charge of the rudder. Witness did not hear him say he was going to collect the fares. The people were singing, and the sea was calm until the disaster occurred.
Edward Gardner, who was in charge of the nearest boat, said he had 16 adult passengers and one child on board his vessel, and no one to assist him. On Monday the weather was very fine, and the sea perfectly smooth, but he felt a gust of wind about the time of the accident to the Matchless, though perhaps not to the same extent as Houghton did. Witness's boat was making a direct turn for Grange, when a sudden puff filled the sails the contrary way. He looked to the weather side, and, thinking that the next gust would be an ordinary one, did not alter his course. When it did come it was more like a whirlwind than anything else, and struck his boat on the beam. He was about 100 yards from Houghton's boat and saw it suddenly heel over. Making all haste to the spot, he rendered aid, and rescued six people alive and picked up one dead body. The Matchless, on heeling over, filled with water, and then settled down and sank, leaving the passengers struggling in the water.
In answer to Mr. Tilly the witness said he had been connected with boating for 25 years, and the accident was the first that had happened within his recollection. Houghton's boat was, for size and stability, one of the best in the district. Houghton, who was a thoroughly experienced man and very competent, had the mainsail, topsail, and the jib up, but the foresail down. Both boats were moving about as slowly as they could, waiting for more water. Houghton was at his proper place in being at the tiller. They were all brought up to work boats single-handed, but had a practice on breezy days of taking an extra hand with them for the purpose of dropping the anchor, embarking and disembarking passengers. Had there been an extra man on this occasion, and had he occupied the usual position at the bow, he would have had no command over the sails.he breeze which struck Houghton's boat was a very peculiar one and might never recur. It seemed to come all round - from the easterly and westerly points of the compass. Assuming that Houghton saw this gust of wind coming, witness did not know what he could have done, unless her had let the ropes go and the sheets fly loose. The boat was of sufficient capacity for the passengers it had on board, and all appeared to be sitting while in the channel, and not perched on the edge. Before the accident happened there seemed to be no gusts to give the man warning. Witness did not notice this particular gust until he was close up to it, when the water seemed black. The wind sometimes seemed to strike straight down, and when that was so it was more serious that when it travelled on the water.
Joseph Wilson, boatman in charge of another pleasure yacht about half a mile ahead of the Matchless, said he had 30 passengers on board and alone had charge of the boat. On looking round he saw the Matchless going down by the stern, and it immediately disappeared. He at once went to assist and picked up two bodies floating on the surface. He did not see the squall coming, but felt a little gust.
Richard Gardner, who was in charge of another yacht about half a mile away, deposed to witnessing the accident, as in dodging about the channel he had to go in the direction of the Matchless. It was rather puffy, but Houghton must have experienced something more than the witness did, because witness never altered his course in consequence of any gusts. The Matchless was a fine, powerful boat, capable of holding over 30 passengers.
By Mr. Tilly. - The Matchless was constructed to work from the tiller. In fact all their boats were so constructed by the man at the stern.
Samuel Houghton, owner of the Matchless deposed that the yacht was built 17 years ago, and was perfectly sound and watertight. He calculated that there were 26 adults and a few children on board when the accident happened. The largest load he remembered having was 34 Sunday-school teachers and children. About 25 could be comfortably seated in the vessel. On Monday there were a lot of people wanting to get into the boat, but he refused to take more than those he had in the yacht. When off Silverdale a gust of wind caught the sail and threw it right over. The water seemed rather dark in front of the bow at the time, but was so calm that a gentleman remarked just vefore that the boat seemed to have stopped. Then the jib suddenly came back, and the boat went right over. He had no time to let go the ropes or to do anything else before the vessel capsized. When the boat heeled over the sails lay flat on the water. A seat came out, and with that he kept himself afloat. He was unable to swim, There were no life-belts or life-buoys on board. The boat could not have capsized if the wind had not struck her broadside, and if he had had time to turn the vessel he could have saved the passengers. The boat was now almost covered with sand, and the mast was broken off. He held licences from the Morecambe Local Board, both for himself and for the boat. The local board officials never made any inquiry as to the size of the vessel or as to how many passengers it carried, and he was not aware that any one inspected it on their behalf.
By a juryman,-They were under no restrictions as to the number of passengers they carried.
Mr. Tilly here stated that the number of passengers was mentioned in licences for hackney carriages but not in those for pleasure boats.
The bye-laws of the local board relating to pleasure boats were then produced, it being sown that the number was left to the discretion of the boatmen.
A juryman pointed out that this discretion was not given to drivers of hackney carriages.
Houghton, continuing, said the boat was overhauled last autumn, and was tight from keel to gunwale.
Police-inspector Hodgson deposed that 16 bodies had been recovered. Nine persons were rescued, and there were nine still missing - namely, Alice Greenwood, Burnley, aged 38; Arthur Clegg, Burnley, aged 4; Mary Alice Webster, Skipton, aged 26; Edith Webster, Skipton, aged 5; Florence Carter, Bradford, aged 26; Sarah Whitehead, Burnley, aged 42; Fred Whitehead, 14 months; Elijah Monks, Bolton, aged 60; and Eliza Ann Heaton, Gorton, near Manchester, aged 14, making 34 on board all told. The list of the missing was ascertained direct from the relatives of those in the boat.
The Coroner, in summing up, after a sympathetic reference to the sad occurrence, said the attention of the entire kingdon had been drawn to this overwhelming trouble, and they ought to be satisfied that everything had been done in the way of precaution to save lives. The day and the tide were favourable, the boatman was experienced and perfectly sober, and nothing happened until a sudden squall came on, when the passengers were overwhelmed in the bay. He referred to the conditions under which licences were issued by the local board, who had no power to restrict the number of passengers on a pleasure boat, and said the board should certainly insist on the boats carrying life-buoys, belts, and other appliances for the safety of the passengers. There should be some restrictions locally or imperially to enforce that, and he would lay the facts before the Board of Trade to see what could be done in the matter. Houghton's evidence had been given plainly and creditably, but it was worthy of remark that he, like the pther boatman could not swim. The jury must disregard the rumours circulated as to his being about to collect the fares, and must take the evidence, which did not at all warrant anything being said against the skill of the boatman.
The jury, after ten minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidentally drowned," and exonerated Houghton from all blame. They wished to draw attention to the heroic conduct of the other boatmen, more especially that of Edward and Richard Gardner, and asked the Coroner to recommend the two latter to the Royal Humane Society for their medal. The jury also expressed their deepest sympathy with the relatives of the deceased and sufferers by the disaster.
The Coroner promised to carry out the recommendation of the jury, and expressed entire concurrence with their verdict.
It was subsequently announced that the local board were raising a subscription fund and were undertaking the expense of removing the bodies of the deceased to their respective homes.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 1:57 pm 
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Many thanks to Gloria for her help in obtaining and transcribing this article.

Burnley Express and Advertiser September 5th 1894

BEREAVED BURNLEY

TERRIBLE BOATING FATALITY

TWENTY LIVES LOST

12 BUNLEY PEOPLE DROWNED

HEARTRENDING SCENES

NARRATIVES OF SURVIVORS

In the middle of the enjoyment of the September holiday Burnley has been suddenly plunged into mourning. News came to hand on Monday of a boating disaster at Morecambe. At first, accounts varied as to the extent of the disaster. Presently it became known that some twenty persons were missing and that all, it was feared, had been drowned. Worse than all there followed the dire inteligence that the majority of the passengers in the ill-fated boat were Burnley people. At once the town became excited and the excitement intensified as details multiplied. Every scrap of information was eagerly read. Many people who had relatives and friends staying at Morecambe had a terribly anxious time of it. Enquiries were made from all quarters in the locality and the telephone was in constant use. Brief accounts of the disaster were published in many shop windows. At street corners, especially in the neighbourhood where a bereavement was feared, and in all places where people met together, the sad even was the topic of discussion. The hugeness of the disaster was overwhelming, and the uncertainty which prevailed as to who had been drowned and who had been fortunate enough to escape added to the shock which seemed to find an expression in almost every countenance. In the matter of lives lost it is the biggest calamity which had overtaken Burnley for many years. No wonder, then, that the town wore a general air of bereavement and that expressions of sympathy and condolence were to be heard on all bands.

HOW THE ACCIDENT HAPPENED
The details of the disaster are simple. In common with most seaside places Morecambe ffers plenty of attraction in the way of sailing. A favourite practice is to have an hour or two's cruise on the bay in one of the many sailing boats which put off from the Princess Landing Stage. They are usually well tilled, and, owing to the prescence of so many holiday makers in the town, it so happened that the Matchless, a boat belonging to an experienced fisherman, Samuel Houghton by name, of 45 Podder Street, Morecambe, had a full complement when she set off from the landing stage for a cruise in the direction of Grange-over-Sands. The sea was calm and a light breeze tempered the brilliant sunshine. The weather conditions appeared to be favourable for a pleasurable sail. The party numbered about 30 in all, and consisted of men, women, and children. As is usually the case on a trip of this kind, the majority of the passengers were inknown to each other, but it subsequently transpired that in one case at least nine persons had been staying in one house and all hailed from Burnley. Unhappily, all but one of this number are placed among the victims. The time passed merrily. The happy party, unconscious of the watery graves which awaited most of them, were even singing when the accident happened.

THE FATAL GUST
When five or six miles from the starting place the yacht was at a point two miles from Silverdale, a small watering place on the opposite side of the bay. The tide was on the flow, but there not being sufficient water to cross the sandbanks, the boat was driving steadily up channel. When rear to the estuary of the River Wear, which here enters the bay, about six miles from Morecambe - the water has since been described by one of the survivors as being rather choppy owing to the rapidly running tidal current meeting the fresh water from the river - suddenly, without the slightest warning, the boat heeled completely over. The accounts of what exactly occurred are somewhat contradictory but the statement of the boatman, Houghton, who is one of the steadiest of the seafaring men in the locality and is said to be a staunch teatotaller is probably the most reliable. He states that at the time of the disaster, about twelve o'clock, he was going to slacken the main sheet and let the boat go easily up Channel while he collected the fares. He had not slackened the sail but was on the point of doing so when a gust of wind heeled her right over without the slightest warning in about nine feet of water. Of course the whole of the passengers were precipitated into the water and the struggle for life was distressing in the extreme. Some became entangled in the sails and cordage and had no chance to save themselves. Others at once got clear of the boat and struck out for their lives. Amongst them was Mr. Amos Boothman, cotton spinner 28 Hall-street Burnley. Who had gone out accompanied by his sweetheart Miss Lizzie Walker, daughter of Mr Walker, Brazier 50 Queensberry-road, Piccadilly Road, Burnley. He does not attribute any blame to the boatman but syas that Houghton had just got the sail loose when the wind caught it and capsized the craft. Fortunately for himself he was able to swim and managed to keep afloat a little while. Then he seized the mast and clung to it until help was at hand. As will be seen below, Miss Walker escaped in a marvellous manner.

THE WORK OR RESCUE
The occupants of a boat in charge of Edward Gardner, jun. which was near, were horrified to witness the almost instantaneous disappearance of Houghton's yacht. With admirable presence of mind, Gardner first devoted his attention to preventing a panic amongst his own passengers, and then made his way with all speed to rescue with his boat. In the midst of the struggling people in the water, friendly hands were held out on all sides of the craft to grasp those unfortunate fellow pleasure seekers who were struggling violently for succour. By the direction of young Gardner no attempt was at first made to drag them into the boat, his instructions to the anxious passengers being to simply keep as many people afloat as possible by holding them at the gunwale until there was no apparent chance to secure more of the wrecked trippers. By this means, seven persons - three men, two women and two children - were rescued. One man was evidently dead, his head being badly bruised. A second boat, in charge of Richard Gardner, sen, a veteran boatman, was about a quarter of a mile distant, but running with the current was speedily on the scene of the accident. He rescued Houghton alive, and recovered also the body of a female passenger. After cruising about the spot until it was apparent no further aid could be rendered, the two boats returned to Morecambe at haf-past one, bringing the first tidings of the disaster, and leaving behind them other boats continuing the search.

BREAKING THE NEWS
The occurrence does not seem to have been witnessed from the shore, for the first inclination of the disaster was when the Gardners' boats returned before a good wind. The people on the beach say the apparently lifeless body of a young woman (who afterwards turned out to be Miss Walker) being carried ashore from the landing stage and into the Bath Hotel, Northumberland-street. Immediately following were the partly conscious bodies of a boy and girl, the children it subsequently appeared of Mr. Wm. Brierley, manufacturer, Harle Syke, Burnley. Messengers were now dispatched in all directions for medical assistance, and in the meantime vigorous measures were taken to restore animation in the case of the young woman. For three hours her life hung in the balance. Police-constable Johnson, Inspector Lamb and a boatman named Adam Woodhouse, junr., worked at the Sylvester method of artificial respiration for the whole of that period, and labourer without cessation, whilst the perspiration poured down their faces. Eventually they had the satisfaction of restoring consciousness, and the medical gentleman spoke in terms of the highest praise of their work. Another female was meanwhile taken to the baths connected with the People's Palace, and after two hours exertion on the part of Miss Alice Webb, professional swimmer, and the attendants, she showed signs of recovery, and ultimately gave her name as Mrs. Brooks of Ramsbottom. The bodies of a man and a woman were carried on the police ambulance to the dressing room used by the local football club behind the King's Arms Hotel, and were soon afterwards followed by those of the men picked up by a third boat. The utmost excitement now prevailed, the promenade being quickly thronged by anxious crowds of visitors, in many cases full of painful uncertainty as to the whereabouts of relatives or friends. On the landing of Houghton and his companions the extent of the disaster was speedily realised, and deep gloom overspread the whole town.

THE WORK OF IDENTIFICATION
Inspector Hodgson and his staff were indefatigable in endeavouring to ascertain the number missing, the names of the saved and the identity of the dead. This was a work of considerable difficulty and delay owing to the rescued persons having been conveyed in most cases to the places where they were staying. The survivors were ultimately found to be, in addition to Houghton, the young Boothman, and Mrs. Clegg, of Belvedere-road, Burnley, both staying with Mrs. Waddington in Victoria-street. The latter was in a serious condition owing to exhaustion from immersion. There were missing from this house Mrs. Clegg's husband and child, and Miss Walker (who, as above stated) eventually proved to be identical with the young woman at the bath Hotel. From Mrs. Webster's in Edward-street, nine persons are said to have set out in the ill-fated boat, namely, Mrs Hargreaves, Mrs. Whitehead, the latter's baby, and a son, 17 years of age; Mrs. Whitehead's unmarried sister. Mr. and Mrs Robinson and their daughter Florence, all from Byerden-lane, Burnley. Of these only Mr. Robinson was amongst the rescued. He rushed about almost distracted in search of tidings of his wife and daughter. Another daughter had declined to go in the boat in consequence of her dislike for sailing, and was consequently spared. From a house in Erving-terrace four visitors set out in the morning with the intention of going to Grange, and had not then returned. Three sisters, with their husbands and the members of their families, had been staying in Morecambe - Mr. and Mrs. Heaton, of Corton, near Manchester, and Mr. and Mrs. Monk of Bolton, at Erving-terrace, and Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd, in Euston-road. The three gentlemen, along with Mr. Heaton's youngest daughter, aged fourteen, left their appartments with the intention of proceeding to Grange, and as they did not return in due time it was at once feared that they were on board the unfortunate boat. An unidentified body was afterwards found to answer the description of Mr. Shepherd, and the possession of two return tickets to Bolton and a house key rendered this almost a certainty.

FATHERLESS BURNLEY CHILDREN
The case of the two little Brierley's is particularly sad. The children son recovered from their exhaustion, and made known their names. Their father was missing, and his body was brought ashore later on. The mother and two remaining children did not accompany the party on their visit to Morecambe. Three of the bodies recovered were identified as follows:- Jonas Webster, mechanic, Skipton, aged about 50. Samuel Brooks, Holcombe, Ramsbottom, aged 55 and a sister-in-law of Brooks, aged 45 whose name has not transpired. Mr. William Milner, of Skipton, who arrived by day excursion in the morning, and accompanied Mr. Jonas Webster and party on the ill-fated excursion was among the rescued. He identified one of the bodies as that of Mr. Webster, whose daughter and grand-daughter were amongst the missing.

AN ARDUOUS SEARCH
Houghton, who was one of the first to recover, went back to the scene of the disaster in a yacht with another party in order to attempt to recover more of the bodies of those who had been drowned, and Mr. Lee, the chairman of the Local Board, chartered a small steamer and sent police and boatmen out to help in the work. The task of the party in charge of these boats proved to be a long and arduous one. The tide, which was about at full when the boat was over-turned, runs out very rapidly, and it was thought quite possible that some of the bodies might have been carried out to sea. On the other hand, the sand is so soft and treacherous in parts that it was found that if some of them were left by the residing water they would sink in the sand and never be recovered. On shore there were many spectators, who, by the aid of powerful glasses could see distinctly all the operations of the party, and as bodies were found word was telephoned to the police inspector at Morecambe from Grange. About eight o'clock at night word came from Grange that a boat had left the scene of the accident with the bodies of nine more persons five men, three women and one child - and was on its way to the shore. The tide was then almost at the lowest point.

A GRUESOME TASK
It subsequently transpired that amongst tjose bodies were those of other Burnley people Mr. Brierley, Mr Whitehead and Miss Ingham. On Tuesday morning a crowd again assembled and occasionally an acquaintance or relative anxious as to the fate of those who went on the excursion would be allowed to inspect the bodies. Most of the identifications were made by the lodging house keepers with whom the excursionists had been staying. A Bradford newspaper reporter named Carter was identified in this way by his landlady, who states that he was connected with the "Bradford Observer". His wife is missing, but the body of his two-year-old child Doris lies amongst the dead in the mortuary.

THE CONSTERNATION AT MORECAMBE
Throughout Monday and Tuesday the greatest excitement and consternation prevailed at Morecambe for though the number of persons missing was known within a few, it was impossible to tell exactly who they were. Most of the survivors were too much exhausted to give information: in one case, that of Mrs. Clegg, whose husband and child are lost and who is herself suffering from cancer in the breast, fears were at first entertained of her recovery. She is now, however, improving.

GREAT ANXIETY
Some of the survivors had no acquaintances on the yacht, and as many had left their lodgings in the morning without giving intimation of where they were going, it was a matter of the greatest difficulty to ascertain who were to be classed amongst the missing. Therefore it was an anxious day fir a large number of people who would have had their fears set at rest if anybody had been able to make out a complete list. Many reports as to people being missing were sent in to the police and afterwards withdrawn. Large crowds of people waited about the promenade all the afternoon in the expectation of seeing boats arrive with more of the bodies of the unfortunate people.

THE FIRST ACCIDENT OF THE KIND
The accident has thrown a deep gloom over the whole of Morecambe. Of course, it is obvious that it will play havoc with the boating for this season and beyond that, it will give rise to an entirely new fear in regard to boating in the bay which may not pass for some time. As a matter of fact, this is the first accident of the sort which has ever happened in the bay, and it is some eight or nine years since the life of a single visitor was lost by a boating mishap of any sort. The bay has enjoyed a special reputation for safety, and the consequence of the immunity from mishaps has been that no regulations of any sort have been made with regard to the carrying of passengers. It is not, however, suggested that in this case there has been any overcrowding. Houghton's boat was one of the largest in the place, and it is quite a usual thing to carry thirty-five or thirty-six passengers in one of them. A peculiar circumstance, to which attention has been drawn by the occurrance, is the fact that there is no public mortuary at Morecambe. these and other matters will no doubt receive some attention at the hands of the jury who will serve upon the coroner's inquest. During Monday telegrams of inquiry in great quantities had flowed into the local telegraph office from people who had relatives in MOrecambe, and the office was crowded during the whole of the afternoon and evening with visitors, who were answering inquiries as to the safety of themselves and their friends.

A DANGEROUS PLACE
Later intelligence states that the accident was witnessed from the shore at Grange, three miles away, and from Silverdale, about two miles away, and caused the greatest consternation. Nobody in two boats in front of the Matchless saw the accident, but on the arrival of the passengers on these boats at Grange, Mr. T.P.Sykes, of Great Horton, Bradford, who was amongst them, was informed by a gentleman that he had observed the overturning of one of the yachts through his glass. He was greatly surprised to find that Mr. Sykes and his companions were unable to give him any information about the occurrence, and were, indeed, totally ignoran of it. The place where the boat capsized is regarded as very dangerous by boatmen, the channel having shifted considerably this summer owing to the heavy floods down the rivers. An old wall has been exposed which was part of a scheme started with the idea of reclaiming a large part of the bay, but the scheme was abandoned.

OPENING OF THE INQUEST.
MORE BURNLEY PEOPLE IDENTIFIED
On Tuesday morning the inquest was opened at the King's Arms Hotel, the bodies with regard to which the inquiry was made being those of Samuel Brooks, Joseph Carter, and Ann williams. Mr L. Holden, coroner for the Lancaster district, conducted the inquiry. Inspr. Hodgson was present. The following constituted the jury:-John Lee (foreman), William Clarke, John Bland, ? Willis, A Storey, John Brown, William Moorhouse, J. Fenton, J.P. McNair, Jos. Howes, A. Walker, T.H. Ashworth, E. Turner, jun. and J.N. Imbrie. The inquest took place in the large dining room of the hotel, and was attended by a considerable number of Press representatives.
In opening the inquiry the coroner said: Gentlemen, I am sure you must shrink from the contemplation of so great a calamity as that which took place here yesterday, when a large party in pursuit of health and pleasure went out in a boat, and though the wind and tide were both favourable, I understand the boat upset, and a large number of people, exactly how many is not known, were thrown into the sea, plunging their families and relatives into the direct distress. I only propose to call evidence of identification, leaving the question of the foundering of the boat or any question that may arise as to negligence, if there was any, to a later period. It is desirable that the bodies should be identified and taken to their relatives without further delay.
Joseph Hamer, carter, Ramsbottom, said: I know Samuel Brooks, who was my uncle, and was about 54 years of age. He was a warper. I last saw him alive on Friday night, and that was at Ramsbottom. He was then quite well. He had a wife, but no children. I know Ann Williams, who was a widow, her husband having been a tailor. She was my aunt. I last saw her alive at Ramsbottom on Thursday. She has left two children.
Stuart Whatmough, wool buyer, Bradford, deposed that one of the bodies, that of his cousin, Joseph Fawcett Carter, about 24 years of age, who was a reporter for the "Bradford Observer". Witness last saw him alive about 7 o'clock on Saturday evening, on the promenade at Morecambe, when he was in good health. He was a married man with one child.
The jury having been re sworn, evidence of identification with regard to the bodies of Wright Shepherd, John Heaton, and Doris Carter was given. The last witness was recalled, and identified the body of the child as Doris Carter, daughter of Joseph Fawcett Carter.
John Heaton, blacksmith, Gorton, near Manchester, identified the bodies of Wright Shepherd, 55, bleacher and finisher, Prospect-hill, Turton; and also John Heaton, striker, Gorton, the latter being his father. He last saw him alive last Sunday week.
The jury were again re-sworn, and evidence taken with regard to Edmund Clegg and John Parkinson.
John Clegg, weaver, 100, Belvedere-road, Burnley, identified the body of his father, Edmund Clegg, tackler, aged 50 years. He last saw him alive on Friday night at his home previous to leaving for Morecambe. He also identified another body as that of John Parkinson, tackler.
The inquiry was then adjourned until this (Wednesday) morning at half-past nine, Further evidence of identification will be given.
Alice Greenwood, weaver, 26, Eastham-street, Burney; William Brierley, cotton manufacturer, 1 Queen-street, Briercliffe near Burnley, ahev also been identified.

WHAT AN EYE WITNESS SAW
An account of what actually happened has been given by Mr. Levi Atock, 2 Carr-st., Burnley. He states; I went down to the beach for the purpose of having a sail. Three or four boats were at the landing stage. There were four for Grange, including Houghton's boat, which was filling faster than the others and, thinking it would be out sooner, I intended to get in. But somehow or other our party from Burnley came down, and I joined the party with one of the other boats. When we got a long way out towards Gange - we had a long way round to go, the tide being low - we kept passing and repassing one another. A man sitting behind me observed that Houghton's boat had capsized, and exclaimed to the man who was sterring the boat. "What's up?" The steerman said "I don't know; I'm turning round. Everyone keep their seats." He kept on saying "Keep cool." He steered forward, towards where there were some persons floating. I picked up a woman's hat, and a little further on aother person was floating - a big man. I believe his name is Webster - a Skipton man. We pulled him into the boat. We then got to another person and pulled him in, rubbed them and rolled them about. They were both dead, but warm. There was a lot of hubbul among out party whether o go forward to Grange or return to Morecambe. Some wanted to land and said, "We won't come back by the boat." The steerman went towards another boat, which had rescued Houghton and other two persons alive. The man who was steering the other rescue boat said "We're going back to Morecambe," and the steersman said he would leave it to the passengers and they all agreed to turn back. I saw several bodies floating about, but they disappeared by the time we had got these two in. At the time of the accident we were about 50 yards off, and very close to a sandbank. I never heard screams. I saw perhaps ten persons in the water floating. Those we got out were floating and the steerman said he had never known dead people to float on the water before. With children there were 36 in our boat, but I don't think there were as many in the other. None of us saw the boat go over. It was done in a jiffy. The man who said "What's up?" afterwards said "I saw a sail on the water;" All was going on pleasantly and the sea as nice and as calm as it could be. There were no ropes thrown out, and there seemed to be no signalling from one boat to another. One boat which was yards away went off as they had seen nothing and one steersman shouted out "Jack" to the other steersman, who had got to far away to hear. Two steamers passed by directly afterwards, and they did not seem to be informed that anything had occurred.

THE "DAILY CHRONICLE" SPEAKS OUT
The "Daily chronicle" is afraid that the blame for this terrible accident cannot be laid to the visitation of the winds. The boatman may have only been doing what every other boatman does, but the Skegness disaster should surely have provided a danger signal, for this summer, at least sufficient to deter this Morecambe boatman from leaving his control over the sails for a single instant. Fishermen who turn their boats into pleasure crafts have no right to forget the varous consequences that may result from a heavy lurch when the boat is crowded. It is necessary to speak out. Thousands of people will be enjoying themselves to-day, and every day for weeks to come in the same way as these poor Burnley excursionists. Under no circumstances should they put to sea in a boat that is full enough without them. And once afloat they should insist that someone remains to handle the ropes throughout the trip. We are no believers in putting passengers in command of vessels, but experience has shown that in the heightt of the holiday season the love of pelf may lead capable boatmen to encounter risks which ought not to be undertaken. There is nothing for it, therefore, but for trippers to use their own common sense and satisfy themselves that the simplest precautions for safety are adopted.

INTERVIEWS WITH RELATIVES AND SURVIVORS.
AN AFFLICTED VILLAGE
"Byerden has catched it," said a sympathetic inhabitant of Reedley Hallows to me yesterday evening, writes one of our representatives, when, instinctively divining my errand, I enquired for the residence of some of the victims of the disaster. "Catched" I found to be a synonym for suffering, as there was no doubt that the village of Byerden, situated at the foot of Byerden-lane and skirted by the railway, from which a complete view of the hamlet is obtained, had indeed been visited with terrible bereavements. In three households were gaps suddenly created which it is impossible to fill, and motherless children and mourning husbands and other relatives remain to bear their affliction with all the fortitude which they can summon to their aid. I will first of all conduct my readers to the humble, but cleanly and homely, cottage of the Whiteheads. Here lived, until Saturday last, Mr. Daniel and Mrs. Whitehead (nee Sarah Ingham, 43 years of age), their six children (all boys, varying from 17 years to 14 months old), Ann Ingham (aged 15) sister of Mrs.Whitehead, and Mr. Ingham (aged 76 years), father of the two women. The Inghams are a Wheatley Lane family, but have ???? at Byerden for some time now. "Aunt Ann went to work," said a relative to me, "to support her father, she was a rover at Birley's. Mrs Whitehead and her sister and her eldest son (Dick, aged 17 years) and baby boy went to MOrecambe last Saturday, I am further told, intending to return the following Tuesday night. They, and some neighbours, of whom I shall presently have to say something, all went to lodge at a house in Edward-street, MOrecambe, and my informant tells me that last Sunday she was at Morecambe and met her aunt and cousins, who told her they were all lodging at the same house. Daniel Whitehead and two of the children had been there before. "Yes" broke in the father of the lost women and children, he being overwhelmed with grief, " the father and two childred were there at the Fair, and now she has been and taken two and the four are drowned." And the recollection of the great loss filled him with a grief painful to witness. Answering other questions, the nieces who have charge of the house tell me that at noon to-day a telegram was received stating that the bodies of Mrs. Whitehead and her baby had not been recovered. The corpses of Miss Ingham and the boy Dick Whitehead were, they were told, found. That morning a telegram had also been received instructing Mr. Whitehead and two neighbours, Mr. Hargreaves and Miss Robinson, to come to Morecambe at once, and they had proceeded there. And now I will pass from the home of this bereaved family to a cottage, in the same row of houses, two doors higher up the road - to 77 Byerden-lane, the residence of a
SORROWING HUSBAND AND FATHER.
This is Mr. Robinson, a spinner at Reedley Hallows Mill. Until Saturday last he resided in this cottage with his wife and seven children, the eldest being a daughter 21 years of age, and the youngest a lad who will complete his fourth year next March. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson and two younger girls (Florence, aged 15 years, and Margaret Ann, aged 13 years), went to Morecambe on Saturday last, they also intending to return home the following Tuesday evening. Miss Robinson remained at home to take charge of her four brothers, but, at the time of my visit to the house, she was absent, having beyed telegraph instructions and proceeded to Morecambe this morning. A neighbour, Mrs. Hartley, had kindly volunteered to look after the house and the lads. In conversation with Mrs. Hartley and others, I learn that Margaret Ann Robinson had a great aversion to sailing, and it is to this that she owes her life, as she did not accompany her father, mother, and sister, in the voyage upon the ill-fated yacht. I am further told, that Mrs. Robinson; who, with the daughter; Florence, was drowned, the father being saved, was 45 years of age, and had had eight children, the eldest having enlisted in the Scots Guards, and being at present stationed in London. They had lived at Byerden for about seven years, and had previously lived at Gargrave for a considerable period. Mr. Robinson, has, however, lived in Burnley during the greater part of his life. I must now pass to the end of the row of cottages, where the closed shutters of the village shop offer further external evidences of
GRIEF AND SORROW.
This is the home of Mr. Hargreaves, grocer, whose wife, aged about 60 years had formed one of the party from Byerden to Morecambe. Mr. Hargreaves is at Morecambe, but his son informed me that his mother had not been in good health and took a ten days ticket for Morecambe last Saturday, her intention being to remain there during the period her ticket allowed if she found that her visit to the seaside was beneficial to her health. The son also informed me further that no information of any misadventure to his mother was conveyed to him and his father except the mention of the name "Mrs. Hargreaves," with no address in the papers this morning. They knew that Mrs. Hargreaves had gone to MOrecambe in the company of the Whiteheads and Robinsons, and this led them to expect that something had happened to her. Accordingly, before the arrival of the telegram asking for Mr. Whitehead, Mr. Hargreaves and Miss Robinson to proceed for Morecambe, he left Burnley for the seaside early this morning. Mr. and Mrs. Hargreaves formerley lived at Hartley-street, Burnley, and later at Fence, before removing to Byerden four years ago. Their married son lives in Burnley Lane. I was told that it was the intention of the families of the drowned persons to bring the recovered bodies to Byerden at the earliest opportunity.

ANOTHER FATHERLESS FAMILY
Yesterday morning another of our representatives called at the residence of Mrs. Clegg, 100 Belvedere-road and found the family in deep grief. They had ascertained that morning that their father's body had been recovered, but were still in doubt as to the fate of their young brother. News had been received, however, that their mother was better, although still unable to move from the place to which she had been taken. Mr. Clegg was a tackler, and was between 50 and 60 years of age. He leaves a widow and three sons and three daughters (one of the latter being married). It was at first rumoured that the victim of this name was Mr. Arthur Clegg of the firm of Messrs. Clegg Bros., joiners and builders, and the report was probably due to circumstance that Mr. Arthur Clegg lives in the same row of homes as the deceased.

A BROTHER AND SISTER DROWNED
Amongst the bodies recovered yesterday were those of Mrs. and Miss Robinson, (referred to above) and Mr. John Parkinson, overlooker, 5 Eastham-street, Burnley making enquiries in the neighbourhood last night, out reporter learnt that Mr. Parkinson was a great friend of the Cleggs. In company with Mrs. Alice Greenwood, a weaver, widow, and sister of Mr. Parkinson, they journeyed to Morecambe on Saturday morning, intending to return on Monday night. The relatives noticed Mr. Clegg's name in the newspapers, and at once telegraphed yesterday morning to where Mrs. Greenwood and her brother had been lodging, In fact, the news of the disaster had made them very anxious all night. They soon received a wire in reply informing them that their brother was drowned and the sister was missing. Mrs. Greenwood had only been living at 26, Eastham-street for three weeks, having come to wrk under her brother, who was a tackler. Upon receipt of the telegram Mr. James Henry Parkinson (brother of the deceased) and Mr. Thomas Greenwood (father-in-law of Mrs. Greenwood) went to Morecambe and their friends have not yet heard anything from them. The bodies (and it may be presumes that Mrs. Greenwood's will be recovered by the time) will be brought home to-day (wednesday) to be interred at Cornholme, from which place all the parties come. This case is particularly distressing in as much as Mr. Parkinson leaves a widow and five children (none of whom are working), and Mrs. Greenwood (who was 38 years of age) a family of four.

SYMPATHY AT BRIERCLIFFE
Much sympathy has been felt at Briercliffe for Mrs. Brierley and her family, who have sustained such a sad blow by the loss of the husband and father. As a mark of respect the mill was closed during yesterday.

MR. BOOTHMAN'S RESCUE
The case of Mr. Boothman and Miss Walker is remarkable in many respects. It is related above how he escaped, and here is his own story: "Seven of us left the house, with Miss Walker and myself, about 10 o'clock in the morning to have a sail. We set off, and it was nice sailing, the sea was calm. A sudden gust of wind came, taking my hat off, and the boat tilted up. Everybody rushed to the other side and that seemed to help it over. The boat turned on its side and then sank, and we were all struggling in the water. I struck out when I got in and was swimming about. I missed one boat and turned round and another one coming. A rope was hanging behind and I hung to it, and they pulled me in. The boatman was taken in first, then me, then Mrs. Clegg, then a dead woman". Mr. Boothman is 23 years of age, and a spinner by occupation. His parents had a telegram on Monday stating that "All was right" before they learned news of the disaster, a circumstance which naturally caused them some surprise at the time.

MISS WALKER'S ESCAPE
Mr. Walker is naturally overjoyed at his daughter's wonderful escape. She went to Morecambe on Saturday with Mr. Boothman, and the family were in greta trouble until a telegram was received from her at seven o'clock on Monday evening to the following effect; "Can't get home to-night; been upset in boat. Safe. -Lizzie." It was understood that she would return on the following day, but yesterday morning another wire came stating that she was too unwell to travel. Prior to the arrival of the message, however, her parents had departed for the seaside.

SAVED BY A WALKING STICK: MR. ROBINSON'S STORY
In answer to enquiries Mr. Robinson (who is still at Morecambe) said: - "We started at about ten past ten, as near as I can say, from the Princess Landing Stage. There were about 26 or 28 of us in the boat. They were all singing, and I was in the front up to the mast. It came all at once. The boat turned over and we were clinging to the higher part. My missus said 'Oh! Ben!' and my daughter said 'Oh! Father!'. I got hold of the side of the boat, and a man got hold of me behind. Then the boat turned right over, and it threw me into the water, I was struggling in the water, and a boat came up and I heard a man say 'Keep calm,' and somebody hung out a walking stick, and I collared it just as I was sinking, and I was pulled into the boat. It was with that stick that we were all saved."

"WE ARE GOING OVER"
The small group of Skipton people who had the misfortune to get into the yacht had gone to Morecambe by the day trip. Only one of these, Mr. William Milner, was interviewed. In his sorry plight he had, of course, no place to turn to; and Mr. Metcalfe, of 29, Green-street, offered him a refuge on the recommendation of Inspector Hodgson. When he had somewhat recovered from the effetcs of his struggle in the water he was able to determine the identity of Webster, with whom he had lived at Skipton. He stated that at the time of the accident there was very little breeze, and nobody had any thought of danger until they all found themselves struggling in the water. At the moment of the accident some of the people in the bow of the vessel were singing hymns. As the yacht, suddently heeling over, pitched them all into the water there was no shrieking - none had sufficient warning to enable them to shriek - but there were cries of "We are going over." The water, he adds, was rather choppy, owing to the wind and current being in opposition. All on board seemed to make towards the higher side of the boat when it was heeling over, as if to right the boat if possible.

A RESCUERS ACCOUNT
Edward Gardner, one of the boatman who was fortunate enough to be able to save life, says that as the accident had been witnessed from his boat by the passengers he had some difficulty in calming them, and took care to do this before they had got near to the people who were fighting for their lives in the water. He warned them that when they got to the scene of the accident if they could reach any of the people in the water they must not attempt to drag those into the boat, except under his supervision, but should lay hold of them and keep them to the boat edge until he had time to direct the lifting into the boat. His passengers kept quite calm during the work of rescue, and when they had taken up as many paople as they could see on the surface of the water, they observed a woman and two children clinging together, and holding to the inside of the submerged boat, and with a boat hook Gardner succeeded in dragging them out and getting them into his boat.

HOUGHTON WISHED HE HAD BEEN DROWNED.
A correspndent, writing yesterday says "Visitors to Morecambe this morning were struck by the look of awe which settled upon every countenance, and upon none more than that of the boatman, Samuel Houghton; who was in charge of the ill-fated boat. His face bore looks of anxiety, and in reply to my queries he answered in simple monosyllables. He said everything went well with the party, who were in the most jovial spirits, until the time of the disaster. He was putting about the sail for the purpose of counting the passengers - there were 26 all told - when a sudden gust of wind caught the sail, and the boat overturned, precipitating everyone into the sea. A boat that was in the vicinity succeeded in saving several persons, and the boatman himself first remembered feeling his hand strike a board, with which he succeeded in keeping afloat until picked up."

BURNLEY VISITORS TO MORECAMBE YESTERDAY
As showing the interest taken in the event, it may be mentioned that a large number of people left Burnley yesterday for Morecambe, and the railway company propose to offer special facilities to-day. It is stated that the boatman told some Burnley residents that he had not had an accident for twenty years, and that when he was rescued he said he wished he had been drowned. The loss of the lives of the Burnley people might have been greater, as a number of others proposed to enter the boat but could not find room.

THE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY EXPRESS SYMPATHY
At the monthly meeting of the members of te Burnley Co-operative Society last evening, a note of condolence was passed with the relatives of those drowned in the Morecambe boating disaster, and was left to the Board to decide what should be done respecting the raising of funds for their relief. A heavy calamity the Burnley death toll is even heavier than that which had to be recorded on the occasion of the Helmshore Railway Crash about 30 years since by which a large number of Burnley people lost their lives. In various parts of the town on Monday, telegrams were received from local ????ists to Morecambe announcing their safety and thereby relieving much anxiety.

RESCUED, DROWNED, AND MISSING.
Below we give lists, as far as can be at present ascertained, of those who have been rescued, those who are drowned, and those who are still missing;-
RESCUED
Mrs. Brooks, Ramsbottom
Mr. Robinson, 77 Byerden-lLane, Burnley
Mrs. Clegg, 100 Belvedere-road, Burnley
Mr. James Boothman, 25 Hall-street, Burnley
Mr. William Milner, Skipton
Samuel Houghton, the boatman
Miss Alice Walker, 50 Queensberry-road, Burnley
The son and daughter of Mr. William Brierley, of Harle Syke, Burnley
DROWNED
Wm. Brierley, manufacturer, Briercliffe
Richard Whitehead, 81, Byerden-lane, Burnley
Ann Ingham (aunt of Richard Whitehead) of the same address
Mrs. Sarah Hargreaves, 89 Reedley Hallows, Burnley
Edmund Clegg, 100 Belvedere-road, Burnley
John Parkinson, Eastham-street, Burnley
Mrs. Robinson, Byerden-lane, Burnley
Miss Robinson (daughter of Mrs. Robinson) of the same address
Wright Shepherd, Prospect-hill, Turton
John Heaton, Forton, near Manchester
Samuek Brooks, taper, aged 55, ????, Ramsbottom
Jonas Webster, mechanic, ???? Skipton
Mrs. Ann Williams, Stubbins-lane, Ramsbottom
Joseph Carter, 55, Lupton-street, Bradford
Doris Carter, infant daughter of ???? named
MISSING
Alice Greenwood, widow, Burnley
Arthur clegg, aged four, son of Edmund Clegg, Burnley
Mrs Whitehead and baby, of Burnley, daughter and granddaughter of Jonas Webster, Skipton
Miss Heaton, of Gorton, daughter of John Heaton
Mr. Monk, of bolton, brother-in-law of Shepherd and Heaton.
Mrs. Carter, Bradford.

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Many thanks, once again, to Gloria for her help in obtaining and transcribing this article.

The Burnley Gazette, Wednesday, September 5th 1894

Awful Calamity at Morecambe Bay

A Yacht Capsized

Twelve Burnley Excursionists Drowned

Narrow Escape of Survivors

Grief-Stricken Homes in Burnley

The year's annual September holidays at Burnley will long be remembered as having brought in their ???? of the saddest and most awful calamities with which the history of the town has ever been associated. As usual, the brief autumn holiday, which commenced on Friday evening, and terminated on the following Monday evening, has been extensively taken advantage by the working people of the town to seek the benefits of a change of air and scene. Last Friday night, and again, on Saturday morning, there was a great exodus of Burnley people to different places of popular resort. The growingly popular watering place, Morecambe Bay, received quite its usual share of patronage from Burnley excursionists, large numbers booking to this town on Saturday morning. And here it was that the dreadful boating calamity, which it is our painful duty to have to chronicle, took place, resulting in the loss of ???? great number of lives, in???? unhappily no less than 12 Burnley people, while some half-dozen others had narrow escapes. The sorrow and distress thus occasioned in a number of Burnley homes is almost unprocedented. In several cases the persons who have lost their lives have been the only or main support of a numerous family, and grief at the mishap has been added to a feeling of despair as to their future, in the minds of those who are now bereft of their mainstay. The annual holiday at Ramsbottom and Skipton also commenced last weekend, and
large numbers of excursionists were ???? at Morecambe from these towns, indeed the three towns of Burnley, Skipton and Ramsbottom have finished nearly.

THE WHOLE OF THE VICTIMS
In what has turned out to be probably the most dreadful disaster witnessed at Morecambe, It appears that on Monday morning, about 10 o'clock, ???? ???? by the delightful weather many visitors determined to enjoy the pleasure of a sail to Grange. In ???? boats which left the landing stage about half-past ten in the morning was one to charge of William Houghton, a steady, experienced man who is said to be a total abstainer. The boat load was made up of several groups unknown to each other, and numbered in all about 30 men, women and children. The yacht, which was one of the largest pleasure boats in the bay, was filled to its gross capacity. All went well until within two miles of Silverdale, a small watering place on the opposite side of the bay. The tide was then on its low ebb but there not being sufficient water to cross the sandbanks the yacht was driven steadily up the channel. The whole party were in high spirits and thoroughly enjoying the sail. when nearing the estuary of the small river Wear, which here enters the bay, about six miles from morecambe, the water, as described by one of the party, was rather choppy, owing probably to the rapidly running tidal current meeting the fresh water from the river. Suddenly, without the slightest warning, the boat turned over, and the unfortunate occupants were
STRUGGLING FOR LIFE
in the water. Within a comparatively short distance was another yacht, in charge of Edward Gardner junr., the occupants of which were horrified to witness the almost instantaneous disappearance of Houghton's yacht. With great presence of mind Gardner first devoted his attention to preventing a oanic among his own passengers and then made his way with his own boat towards the struggling people. Willing hands were held out on all sides to grasp those in the water, and by the direction of Gardner an attempt was at first made tp drag them into the boat, the rescuers contenting themselves with keeping the immersed afloat until as many as possible had been secured and there was no apparent chance of saving further life By that time seven persons, three men, two women and two children had been rescued. A second boat, in charge of Richard Gardner, senr., was also about a quarter of a mile distant, but, running with the current, it was speedily on the scene of the disaster, and rescued Houghton alive and the body of a female passenger, who turned out to be Miss Walker of Burnley. After cruising about until it was evident
NO FURTHER AID
could be rendered the boats returned to Morecambe where they arrived about half-past one ???? bringing the first tidings of the disaster. The earliest intimation of anything wrong was the carrying ashore from the landing stage opposite the Peoples Palace of the apparently lifeless form of Miss Walker, conveyed to the Bath Hotel, and followed almost immediately by a boy and a girl both partially conscious and both hailing from Burnley. Messengers were now despatched in all directions for medical assistance and in the meantime vigorous measures were taken to restore annimation in the case of the young woman. It was nearly three hours before she was sufficiently recovered to be considered out of danger. Another female was meanwhile taken to the baths connected with the People's Palace, and after two hours exertion she showed signs of recovery and ultimately gave her name as Mrs. Brooks of Ramsbottom.
The bodies of a man and woman were carried on the police ambulance to the dressing room used by the local football club behind the King's Arms Hotel, and were soon afterwards followed by those of the men picked up in a third boat. The
UTMOST EXCITEMENT
now prevailed, the promenade being quickly thronged by anxious crownds of visitors, in many cases full of painful uncertainty as to the where-abouts of relatives or friends. On the landing of Houghton and his companions the extent of the disaster was steadily realised, and a deep gloom over spread the whole of the town. Inspector Hodgson and his staff were indefatigable endeavouring to ascertain the number missing and the names of the saved, and the identity of the dead. This was a work of considerable difficulty and delay owing to the rescued persons having been conveyed in most cases to the places where they were staying. The survivors were ultimately found to be in addition to boatman Houghton, a young man named James Boothman, of Hull-street Burnley and Mrs. Clegg, of Belvedere-road, Burnley holidaying with Mrs. Waddington, in Victoria-street latter is in a serious condition ???? exhaustion from immersion. There were ???? from this house Mrs. Clegg's husband and child, and Miss Alice Walker, of Queensberry-road, Burnley the sweetheart of the young man Boothman. Miss Walker, however, eventually proved to be ???? ???? with the young woman at the Bath House from Mrs. Webster's, in Edward-street ???? are said to have set out in the
ILL-FATED BOAT
???? Mrs. Hargreaves, Mrs. Whitehead, the ???? baby and a son, 17 years of age; Mrs. Whitehead's unmarried sister, Mr. and Mrs. Robinson and daughter Florence, all from Byerden-lane Burnley. Of these, only Mr. Robinson was amongst the rescued. He rushed about almost dis???? in search of tidings of his wife and daughter. another daughter had declined to go in the boat and was consequently spared. Mr. Wm Milner of Skipton, who arrived by day excursion in that morning and accompanied Mr. Jonas Webster and party on the ill fated excursion, was among the rescued. He identified one of the bodies as that of Mr. Webster, whose daughter and grand-daughter were among the missing. The children at the Bath Hotel soon came round, and stated that their names were Brierley. They are the children of Mr. William Brierley, manufacter, Burnley. Their father was also in the boat, and he has been drowned. The mother and two remaining children did not accompany the party on their visit to Morecambe. Three of the bodies recovered were identified as follows:-Jonas Webster, mechanic, Skipton, aged about 50; Samuel Brooks, Holcombe, Ramsbottom, aged 55 , and a sister-in-law of Brooks, Oh the disaster.
BECOMING KNOWN
Mr. John Lee, chairman of the Morecambe Local Board despatched a small steamer with several boats in tow to the scene of the disaster, with the view to recovery of as many bodies as had been left by the receding tide. Search parties also set out across the sands, and news was in the evening received that eight additional bodies had been picked up and were being conveyed to Morecambe. Owing to the state of the tide, however, it would probably be midnight before they reached Morecambe. They were those of five males, two females and one child.
Yesterday morning, the work of rescuing and identifying the bodies of the drowned persons was proceeded with, large numbers of people assembling in the vicinity of the temporary mortuary.

CAUSE OF THE ACCIDENT
Another account states that the accident occurred as the boatman was about to loose the main sail in order to let the yacht go easily, while he collected his fares. No sooner had he attempted to loose the main sail than a gust of wind suddenly struck the boat, with the result that she capsized, and everyone on board was thrown into the water almost without a moment's warning. So sudden was the disaster that the passengers had scarcely a second to cry for help. The entire party, boatman included, were left to struggle for their lives. Fortunately, just as the calamity occurred, there were several other pleasure boats in the surrounding water, and these at once rushed to the aid of Matchless, and eventually succeeded in rescuing 12 of the party, all of whom were brought to Morecambe, but four of these were dead when got out of the water.

A DANGEROUS PLACE
A Barrow correspondent says:- The place where the boat capsized is regarded as very dangerous by boatmen, the channel having shifted considerably this summer owing to the heavy floods down the rivers. An old wall has been exposed which was part of a scheme started with the idea of reclaiming a large part of the bay, but the scheme was abandoned.

THE DROWNED
The following is a list of the drowned persons:-
William Brierley, manufacturer, Briercliffe, Burnley.
Mrs Whitehead, 81, Byerden-lane, Burnley.
Richard Whitehead, 81, Byerden-lane, Burnley.
Fred Whitehead, aged 14 months, 81, Byerden-lane, Burnley.
Miss Ann Ingham, sister of Mrs Whitehead, 81, Byerden-lane, Burnley.
Mrs. Sarah Robinson, 77, Byerden-lane, Burnley.
Florence Robinson, daughter of the above, 77, Byerden-lane, Burnley.
Mrs. Sarah Hargreaves, 79, Byerden-lane, Burnley.
Mr. Edward Clegg, 100, Belvedere-road, Burnley.
Arthur Clegg, three years old, son of the above, 100 Belvedere-road,

Burnley.
John Parkinson, 5, Eastham-street, Todmorden-road, Burnley.
Mrs. Alice Greenwood, widow (sister of above), 26, Eastham-street, Burnley.
Wright Shepherd, Prospect Hill, Turton.
John Heaton, Gorton, near Manchester.
Samuel Brooks, Taper, aged 55, Holcombe, Ramsbottom.
James Webster, mechanic, Newton, Skipton.
Mrs. Ann Williams, Stubbins-lane, Ramsbottom.
Joseph Carter, 55, journalist, Lupton-street,Bradford.
Doris Carter, infant daughter of last named.

LIST OF THE RESCUED
The greatest difficulty is being experienced in ascertaining those among the party who escaped. It is not known exactly how many were in the boat, estimates ranging from 26 to "over 30". The following is a provisional list as complete as present enquiries allow:-
Mr. Robinson, 77 Byerden-lane, Burnley.
Mrs. Clegg, Belvedere-road, Burnley.
Mr. James Boothman, Hall-street, Burnley.
Miss Elizabeth Walker, Queensbery-road, Burnley.
Nellie and Ben Brierley, children of Mr. Brierley of Harle Syke, Burnley who was drowned.
Mr. William Milner, Skipton.
Mrs. Robinson, Ramsbottom.
Mr. Samuel Houghton, owner of the boat.

THE MISSING
It has been ascertained that the following persons were occupants in the ill-fated boat and no tidings have been received of them:-
A daughter and granddaughter of Jonas Webster, of Skipton.
Mr. Monks, Bolton.
Mr. Heaton, Bolton.
Miss Heaton, Bolton.
A daughter of Mrs. Robinson's is said to have been afraid of the water and did not go for the sail, and to this fact she doubtless owes her life.
Mr. Monks, Mr. Heaton, and Mr. Shepherd are the husbands of three sisters.

THE INQUEST
The inquest was opened at 9:30 at the King's Arms Hotel, on the Promenade, the bodies with regard to which the inquiry was made being those of Samuel Brooks, Joseph Carter, and Ann Williams. Mr. L. Holden, coroner for the Lancaster district, conducted the inquiry. Supr???? Hodgson was present. The following gentlemen constituted the jury:-John Lee(foreman), William Clarke, John Bland, J. Willis, A. Storey, John Brown, William Moorhouse, J. Fenton, J.P. McNair, Jos. Howes, A. Walker, T.H. Ashworth, E. Turner, junr., and J.N. Imbrie. The inquest took place in the large dining room of the hotel, and was attended by a considerable number of press representatives.
In opening the inquiry the coroner said:- Gentlemen,- I am sure you must shrink from the contemplation of so great a calamity as that which took place here yesterday, when a large party in pursuit of health and pleasure went out in a boat, and though the wind and tide were favourable, the boat upset, and a large number of people, exactly how many is not known, were thrown into the sea, plunging their families and relatives into the direst distress. I only propose to call evidence of identification, leaving the question of the foundering of the boat or any question that may arise as to negligence, if there was any, to a later period. It is desirable that the bodies should be identified and taken to their relatives without any delay.
Joseph Hamer, carter, Ramsbottom, said:- I knew Samuel Brooks, who was my uncle, and was about 54 years of age. He was a warper. I last saw him alive on Friday night, and that was at Ramsbottom. He was then quite well. He had a wife, but no children. I know Ann Williams, who was a widow, her husband having been a tailor. She was my aunt. I last saw her alive at Ramsbottom on Thursday. She has left two children.
Stuart Whatcough, wool buyer, Bradford, deposed that one of the bodies, that of his cousin, Joseph Fawcett Carter, about 24 years of age, was a reporter on the Bradford Observer. Witness last saw him alive about seven o'clock on Sunday evening, on the promenade at Morecambe, when he was in good health. He was a married man, with one child.
The jury, having been resworn evidence of identification with regard to the bodies of Wright Shepherd, John Heaton, and John Carter was given. The last witness was recalled, and identified the body of the child as Doris Carter, daughter of Joseph Fawcett Carter.
John Heaton, blacksmith, Gorton near Manchester, identified the bodies of Wright Shepherd, 55, bleacher and finisher, Prospect Hill ???ton and also John Heaton, 51, striker, Gorton, the latter being his father. He last saw him alive last Sunday week.
The jury were again resworn and evidence taken with regard to Edmund Clegg, and John Parkinson.
John Clegg, weaver, 100 Belvedere-road, Burnley identified the body of his father, Edmund Clegg, tackler, aged 50 years. He last saw him alive on Friday night at his home previous to leaving for Morecambe. He also identified another body as that of John Parkinson, 36, tackler, who resided next door to his (Clegg's) father.
The inquiry was then adjourned until this morning at half-past nine. Further evidence of identification will be given.
Alice Greenwood, weaver, 36, Padiham-street, Burnley; William Brierley, cotton manufacturer, 1, Queen-street, Briercliffe near Burnley, have also been identified.

RECEIPT OF THE NEWS IN BURNLEY
The calamity is the most disastrous that has occurred to Burnley since the Helmshore railway crash, about 30 years since, and the death roll at Morecambe is even greater than on that occasion. Burnley was, on the receipt of the sad tidings on Monday night, thrown into a state of intense anxiety. Morecambe has always been one of the most favourite resorts for the Burnley excursionists. Since the holidays commenced on Friday night, though most of the excursionists have gone to Blackpool, some 400 or 500 persons booked to Morecambe. Large crowds of persons waited anxiously for the latest news on Monday night, and discussed the possible circumstances of the disaster. At the post office a large number of telegrams were received from the Morecambe visitors of the disaster and the safety of the senders. The disaster was the chief topic of conversation at Burnley yesterday. Mr. Walker, of 50, Queensberry-road, stated "My daughter's name is Elizabeth, and not Alice, and I am very thankful to hear of her safety. She went away on Saturday with her sweetheart, Mr. Boothman, to Morecambe. She is 25 years of age, and a very plucky girl. We have heard that she got on to the back of the boatman, Houghton, and was saved in that way." The Chief Constable of Morecambe has been in communication with the Chief Constable of Burnley with respect to the identification of certain bodies which have been recovered. The church bells of Burnley tolled yesterday morning, the blinds were drawn at a large number of houses, and altogether the calamity is keenly felt in several parts of the town - Reedley Hallows district having suffered the most.

LONDON OPINION OF THE CALAMITY
The "Daily Chronicle" is afraid that the blame for this terrible accident cannot be laid to the visitation of the winds. "The boatman may have only been doing what every other boatman does, but the Skehness disaster should surely have provided a danger signal, for this summer at least, sufficient to deter thise Morecambe boatman from leaving his control over the sails for a single instant. Fishermen who turn their boats into pleasure crafts have no right to forget the various consequences that may result from a heavy lurch when the boat is crowded. It is necessary to speak out. Thousands of people will be enjoying themselves to-day, and every day for weeks to come in the same way as those poor Burnley excursionists. Under no circumstances should they put to sea in a boat that is full enough without them. And once afloat they should insist that some one remains to handle the ropes throughout the trip. We are no believers in putting passengers in command of vessels, but experience has shown that in the height of the holiday season the love of pelf may lead capable boatmen to encounter risks which ought not to be undertaken. There is nothing for it, therefore, but for trippers to use their own common sense and satisfy themselves that the simplest precautions for safety are adopted.

A DISTRESSING CASE
One of the most distressing cases in connection with the disaster is the loss of Mr. Heaton of Gorton, near Manchester, Mr. Monks, of Bolton, and Mr. Shepherd, of London. They were married to three sisters, and with their wives and families were spending their holidays at Morecambe. On Monday morning they left their lodgings with Mr. Heaton's daughter, aged 14, to proceed to Grange, but not returning at the appointed time, fears were felt on their behalf. These were confirmed by the finding of the body of a gentleman, who has been identified as Mr. Monks, and doubtless the whole party perished. Several of the bodies were found high and dry on the sandbanks. On being taken to the temporary mortuary, three were identified as being the remains of Mr. William Brierley, manufacturer, Briercliffe, near Burnley, whose two children are among the rescued; Richard Whitehead, 81, Byeren-lane, burnley, and his aunt, Ann Ingham, of the same address.

WITH THE BEREAVED AT BURNLEY

INTERVIEWS WITH THE FAMILIES OF THE DECEASED PERSONS

HEARTRENDING SCENES

A representative of the Gazette yesterday called upon the families of most of the bereaved persons in Burnley. In every case he found the most terrible and heartrending distress prevailing, and in some cases the circumstances of those who are left behind give only to much ground for distress and even despair. At the house of Mr. John Parkinson, 5 Eastham-street, Todmorden-road, Mrs. Parkinson was prostrated with grief and surrounded by a number of relatives and neighbours she refused to believe the tidings that had been brought to her that morning of her husband's death, and every knock that came to the door caused her to exclaim in sobbing tones, "Is it John, is it John." She refused all food, and persisted in the belief that her husband would yet return, a belief doomed to a sad disappointment. There was great reason for her distress, as apart from the natural affection she evidently bore her husband she was left with five young children, four of whom are boys, the eldest being only twelve years of age, ane the youngest being an infant girl, six months old. Mr. Parkinson appears to have been a most respectable and respected man. He was 36 years of age and was a tackler at Messrs. Whitehead and Leavers', Burnley, where he has been for some years. formerly he was employed in a similar capacity at Olive Mount Mill, and on leaving that place he was presented with a testimonial by the operatives as a mark of their esteem and respect. He was a life teatotaller, and has latterly become connected with the Socialists. Information was only conveyed of his death by telegram, yesterday morning, when his dead body was found. Up to this time his wife had been looking for his return. As showing how strong the feeling had taken possession of the poor womans mind that her husband would yet return, it may be mentioned that yesterday afternoon one of the women in the room asked her what her husband's age was, and she replied to the question by saying "Oh, he'll be back soon, and he'll tell you himself."

A PITIFUL CASE.
TWO DEATHS AND NINE PENNILESS CHILDREN
On the opposite of Eastham-street to where Mr. Parkinson resided, at No.26, lived Mrs. Alice Greenwood, a widow, along with her aged mother and her four young fatherless children, whom she herself supported by working in the mill. She was brother to Mr. Parkinson, and two years older than him. Her husband died some three years ago, since when her brother, Mr. Greenwood, has always manifested a lively and truly brotherly interest in her concern. Indeed the brother and sister have always been the very greatest of friends, and none manifested keener distress than he when his sister was bereft of her husband.. She and her brother went together to Morecambe on Saturday morning, intending to return to Burnley on Monday night. They were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Clegg and their young son of Belvedere-road, so that there was a party altogether of five, of whom, alas only one now remains alive. Mrs. Greenwood, it appears, had not been in the best of health of late, and it was thought a trip to the seaside would do her good. During last week she expressed a preference for Blackpool over Morecambe, but her brother persuaded her that there would be a less crowd at Morecambe than Blackpool, and they decided to visit the former place. She, along with her brother and the Cleggs, was in the ill-fated boat, on Monday morning and along with her brother she shared a terrible death. It is thought that her brother, who could swim a little, must have been trying to rescue his sister and thus lost his own life. The eldest of Mrs. Greenwood's children is a boy of 12 years, and he was just about to enter the mill to work half-time along with his mother. The greatest sympathy is felt for Mrs. Parkinson, the mother of Mrs. Greenwood, and Mr. Parkinson, who has thus suddenly been bereft of two of her children, and has the additional sorrow of witnessing their respective offspring left orphans and unprovided for. As she weepingly informed our representative, yesterday, it was more for the children's sake that she was grieved, all of them being so young and helpless, and the feeling was irresistibly borne in upon one that this was indeed a grevous case. Mrs. Greenwood, our representative learned, had worked very hard to maintain her children and keep the house going, and the healthy looks of the children and the cleanliness and neatness of the house bore evidence of the care and attention they received from Mrs. Greenwood and her mother. Indeed as our representative stepped in at the door, he found old Mrs. Parkinson engaged industriously though quietly dusting the furniture, but the trouble at her heart was soon made painfully evident when he entered into conversation with her.

FATHER AND SON DROWNED
The house of Mr. Edward Clegg, overlooker, 100 Belvedere-road, Burnley, was a house of mounring yesterday. Mr. Clegg (aged about 50 years) together with his wife and young son, Arthur Clegg, aged about 3 years, left Burnley for Morecambe on Saturday monring, intending to stop until Monday night. Two of the party, however, the father and young son, were fated never to return home again alive, and Mrs. Clegg is now lying at Morecambe in a very bad state. She had been in weakly health for some time, having suffered from a bad breast. It is hoped, however, that she will recover and be able before long to return home. The three persons were amongst the party who went out for a sail on Monday morning, and the father and son were drowned, while the mother was rescued, though in a very exhausted condition. On Monday afternoon a telegram was received at the house in Belvedere-road requesting the eldest daughter, Hannah, to go over to Morecambe. She was not in at the time, and when she returned it was too late to go that night, but she went
early yesterday morning, along with her eldest brother, and the latter sent a telegram soon after their arrival notifying the melancholy news of the finding of the dead body of the father but not of the little boy, while the mother was said to be improving. The mother was especially fond of this young son, and it was a terrible distress to her that his body had not, up to yesterday afternoon, been discovered. The other members of the family are all grown up and working.

SEVEN DEATHS FROM ONE STREET
A TERRIBLE DEVASTATION

Byerden-lane, in the St-Andrew's district, Burnley, seems to have suffered greatest in the number of deaths from Monday's calamity. Mrs. Sarah Robinson, aged 45 years, of 77 Byerden-lane accompanied by her husband, Benjamin Robinson, a spinner, and their two daughters, Florrie Robinson, aged 15 years and Margaret Ann Robinson, aged 13 years, went to Morecambe on Saturday morning intending to come back to-day. Three of the party went on the ill-fated boat on Monday morning, the fourth member of the family, Margaret Ann refusing to go as she did not like sailing. In the subsequent catastophe which took place, Mrs. Robinson, and her daughter, Florrie, were drowned, while Mr. Robinson was rescued. They had altogether eight of a family, the eldest, a soldier, being away from home. On Monday night the eldest daughter, Ellen Robinson, received a telegram to the following effect:- "Do not be anxious. Hope for Florrie and mother. Margaret Anna and father are safe." Unfortunately, the hope that was expressed for "Florrie and mother" proved to be illfounded as nothing but the finding of dead bodies can now be looked for. The father, after being rescued, on learning that his wife and child were missing became almost distracted and rushed out into the streets of Morecambe in a vain endeavour to render them assistance. He could swim a little and that possibly had something to do with his escaping a watery grave. Up to yesterday afternoon the bodies of the mother and child had not been found. Mr. Robinsons now lies at Morecambe in a somewhat precarious condition, and yesterday his brother, Mr. John Robinson, of Burnley, was telegraphed for, and this circumstance gaves rise to grave apprehensions in the moods(?) of Mr. Robinson's relatives.
The house No. 81, Byerden-lane, claims no less than four of the victims in Monday's calamity, Miss ann Ingham, single woman along with her sister, Mrs. Whitehead and Mrs. Whitehead's two sons, Richard aged 17 years and a baby 14 months old named Fred, went to Morecambe on Saturday with the Robinsons and an old woman names Mrs. Hargreaves residing also in Byerden-lane. Miss Ingham was somewhat older than her married sister. All the four trippers were in the boat that capsized on Monday, and they were all drowned. The bodies of richard Whitehead and Ann Ingham only had been found up to yesterday, at 12 o'clock, the other two being missing. Mrs. Whitehead had four other children besides the two who went with her to Morecambe, and these she left at home in charge of her husband, Mr. Daniel whitehead, who was at Morecambe in the July holidays. Richard Whitehead was the eldest child, all of whom are boys. Ann Ingham was a rover at Birley's mill, Byerden-lane, and at this mill also Mr. Whitehead is engaged as a spinner. Two of the children are working, one half-time and the pther full-time. John Ingham, who was ???? disconsolate at 81 Byerden-lane, said: "I am 70 years of age. There are four who have gone down out of this house-Mrs. Whitehead and her baby, 14 months old; Ann Ingham, sister of Mrs. Whitehead; and Richard Thomas Ingham, son of mrs. Whitehead. They all left on Saturday, and said they liked Morecambe. They went there every year. I am the father of Sarah Whitehead and Ann Ingham, and grandfather of Richard Thomas Whitehead.
Mrs Sarah Hargreaves was the other resident in Byerden-lane, who met with her death on Monday. She was the wife of Henry Hargreaves, who is a roller coverer, employed at Mr. Atkin's mill, Barrowford, and she went with the other two families on the street to Morecambe on Saturday morning. She took a ten day's ticket, as she has not been well of late, and it was thought a change would do her good. Mrs. Hargreaves is almost 60 years of age. Yesterday morning her husband and Mr. Daniel Whitehead received telegrams summoning them to Morecambe, but the two men had already gone before the telegrams arrived. Mrs. Hargreaves leaves two elderly sons, one of whom is married while the other resides with his parents. It will thus be seen that out of a party of nine who left Byerden-lane for Morecambe, on Saturday, only two now remain alive.

A BRIERCLIFFE VICTIM
One of the victims was Mr. William Brierley, manufacturer, of Harle Syke,
Briercliffe, near Burnley. He, along with his two daughters, Nellie Brierley, aged ten years, and her sister, aged seven years, were staying at Morecambe, and went out for a sail in Houghton's boat. Mr. Brierley was
drowned when the boat upset, but his two daughters were rescued, though in an exhausted condition. They are now said to be recovering nicely.

WITH THE RESCUED
Much concern was manifested by the relatives and friends of Miss Lizzie Walker who resides with her parents at 50, Queensbury-road, when it became known that hse and her sweetheart, Mr. James Boothman, of 28, Hull-street, Burnley, were amongst the occupants of the boat. on Monday night a telegram was received by Miss Walker's parents, to the following effect:- "Will not be home to-night. Been upset in boat - Lizzie." The member sof the family were naturally concerned at this news. Yesterday monring, Miss Walker's father telegraphed to see if she was coming home that day. He waited for some time and on getting no reply he and his wife set out for Morecambe. An hour after they had left the reply came as follows:-"Not fit to travel. You had better come." Miss Walker is the oldest of a family of eleven children, and our representative yesterday afternoon found her sister, Miss Maggie Walker, awaiting with great anxiety the receipt of further news as to her sister's condition. Whilst he was there a telegram arrived from Morecambe, and Miss Walker became so nervous at sight of the telegram, fearing as she did that it might contain bad news, that she could hardly muster sufficient courage to open it, and she was gratified and deeply relieved to read the following words sent by her father:- "Lizzie doing well," It might therefore be expected that in due course Miss Walker will be sufficiently recovered to return to Burnley.
Mr. Boothman, Miss Walker's sweetheart, did not return to Burnley yesterday, it being assumed that he was remaining at Morecambe for the adjourned inquest this morning. He telegraphed to his parents in Hull-street that all was right with him, and his parents went to bed on Monday night satisfied. They were however aroused later on by a member of the Walker family who had gone to see if any news had been received about Miss Walker. Yesterday morning a further telegram was received as Boothman's to the following effect:-"All right, not coming home just yet." Mr. Boothman is a member of the Swimming Club at Burnley, and his expertness as a swimmer doubtless had a great deal to do with his rescue. Mr. Carey Nutter, of Hurtley-street, Burnley, was one of the crew of the hapless boat. He is fortunately a very capable swimmer and was able to save himself without assistance.

NARRATIVE OF SURVIVORS
Mr. James Boothman, spinner, Burnley, gives the following account of the affair:- "Seven of us left home, with Miss Walker and myself, about 10 o'clock in the morning to have a sail. We set off, and it was nice sailing, the sea was calm. A sudden gust of wind came, taking my hat off, and the boat tilted up. Everybody rushed to the other side and that seemed to help it over. The boat turned on its side and then sunk, and we were all struggling in the water. I was about the last to get into the water. I struck out when I got in and was swimming about. I missed one boat and turned round and saw another one coming. A rope was hanging behind and I hung to it and they pulled me in. The boatman was taken in first, then me, then Mrs. Clegg, then a dead woman.
Mr. Robinson, of Burnley, states: We started at about 10 past 10 as near as I can say, from the Princess Landing Stage. There were about 26 or 28 of us in the boat. They were all singing, and I was in the front up to the mast. It all came at once. he bost turned over, and we were clinging to the higher part. My missus said 'Oh! Ben!' and my daughter said 'Oh! Father!' I got hold of the side of the boat, and a man got hold of me behind. Then the boat turned right over and it threw me into the water, I was struggling in the water and a boat came up, and I heard a man say 'Keep calm,' and somebody hung out a walking stick, and I collared it just as I was sinking, and I was pulled into the boat. It was with that stick we were all saved."
Houghton, the owner of the pleasure yacht, says:-"The accident occurred about 12 o'clock. I was going to slacken the main sheet and let the boat go easily up the channel while I collected my fares. I had not slackened the sail, but was about to do so when a 'bluff' came and heeled the boat right over. As near as I can tell there were 30 men, women, and children with me."
Mr. W. Milner, of Skipton, in his account of the calamity, says:-"We arrived here from Skipton by excursion this morning. Shortly after our arrival we went for a sail in the yacht. Up to the time of the accident we had as nice a sail as one could wish. No one expected that there was the least bit of danger - in fact at the time the calamity occurred the party in the fore part of the boat were singing hymns. All of a sudden the boat turned over without the slightest warning. There was no shrieking: nothing but the cry, 'We are going! We are going!' I think there were 27 or 28 on the boat. There was no panic. The only thing noticeable was that some passengers threw their weight upon the higher part of the boat in order to prevent it, if possible, from going further, but without avail. At the place where the disaster occurred the sea was 'choppy', owing to the wind and current being in contrary directions."

A RESCUER'S NARRATIVE
Mr. Levi Atack, 2, Carr-street, Burnley, yesterday, gave the following account, I went down to the beach for the purpose of having a sail. Three or four boats were at the landing stage. There were four for Grange, including Houghton's boat, which was filling faster than the others, and, thinking it would be out sooner, I intended to get on. But, somehow or other our party from Burnley came down, and I joined the party with one of the other boats. When we got a long way out towards Grange-we had a long way round to go, the tide being low-we kept passing and repassing one another. a???? ?itting beside me observed that Hought?? ???? had capsized, and exclaimed to the man who was steering the boat, "What's up?" The steersman said "I don't know; I'm turning round. Keep cool: everybody keep their seats." He kept on saying "Keep cool." He steered forward towards where there were some persons floating. I picked up a woman's hat and a little further another person was floating - a bog man; I believe his name was Webster-a Skipton man. We pulled him into the boat. We then got to another person and pulled him in, rubbed them and rolled them about. They were both dead, but warm. There was a lot of hubbub among our party whether to go forward to Grange or return to Morecambe. Some wanted to land and said, "We won't come back by the boat." The steersman went towards another boat, which had rescued Houghton and other two persons alive. The man who was sterring the other rescue boat said, "We're going back to Morecambe," and the steersman said he would leave it to the pasengers, and they all agreed to turn back. I saw several bodies floating about, but they disappeared by the time we had got those two in. As the time of the accident we were about 50 yards off, and very close to a sandbank. I never heard any screams. I saw perhaps ten persons in the water floating. These we got out were floating, and the steersman said he had never known dead people to float on the water before. With children, there were 36 in our boat, but I don't think there were as many in the other. None of us saw the boat go over; it was done in a giffy. The man who said "What's up" ???? afterwards said "I saw a sail on the water." All was going on pleasantly, and the sea as nice and calm as it could be. There were no ropes thrown out, and there seemed to be no signalling from one boat to another. One boat which was yards away went off as if they had seen nothing, and our steersman shouted out "Jack" to the other steersman, who had got too far away to hear. The steamers passed by directly afterwards, and they did not seem to be informed that anything had occurred.

PRAISEWORTHY AID FOR A BURNLEY SURVIVOR
On Monday, when Miss Walker, of Burnley, was brought to land, messengers were despatched in all directions for medical aid, and in the meantime, measures were adopted to restore animation. The efforts of Police-constable Johnson, Cab Inspector Lamb, and a fisherman named Adam Woodhouse, were persevered in for three hours without intermission and with ultimate success. Dr. Renton attributes her recovery to the praiseworthy exertions of these men. Another elderly female was in the meantime taken to the People's Palace, where the exertions of Miss Alice Webb, professional swimmer, and the attnedants, were also successful in restoring life, after two hours. On being removed to the Pier hotel, the lady gave the name of Brooks, a resident of Ramsbottom.

LATEST PARTICULARS
(FROM OUR mORECAMBE CORRESPONDENT)
It has now been definitely ascertained that there were at least 30 passengers (including children) on the unfortunate yacht. Up to last evening 16 bodies had been recovered. Four adults and two children were missing, and nine persons had been saved, and 18 of the passengers were from Burnley, of whom 12 have been drowned, and only six saved. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Robinson and their daughter Florence, of Byerden-lane were in the boat and Mr. Robinson is the only survivor. A younger daughter was also staying at Morecambe but would not go a sail with the other members of the family, Mr. Mrs. and Master Clegg of 100 Belvedere-road were another unfortunate family, the only survivor being Mrs. Clegg. The body of Mr. Clegg has been recovered but that if the child is still missing. Mr. Richard Whitehead, Mrs. Whitehead and baby of Byerden-lane are all drowned, and the bodies of the last two have not yet been found. Mr. Wm. Brierley, manufacturer, Briercliffe, and his two children were also on the boat, the boy and girl were saved but the father was drowned. The other persons from Burnley who were drowned are Miss Ann Ingham, 81 Byerden-lane, John Parkinson and Mrs. Greenwood (brother and sister), and Mrs. Sarah Hargreaves, Byerden-lane, and the remaining survivors are James Boothman, 28 , Hull-street, and Miss A Walker, of 50 Queensbury-road. The last named narrowly escaped with her life, and thought improving is still very weak. It was only after three hours continual working as restoring animation that she showed any signs of life. The Morecambe fishermen are still ???? engaged in searching for the bodies of the remaining persons.

PROPOSED RELIEF FUND
As the monthly meeting of the Burnley Co-operative Society, last night, a vote of concolences was passed with the relatives of the victims in the calamity at Morecambe, and it was left with the Board to consider the question of a relief fund.

_________________
Mel

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